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Opinion | The Tyranny of Convenience

By The New York Times

All the personal tasks in our lives are being made easier. But at what costRead full story

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  • I personally am getting more and more concerned with our heavier reliance on convenience. There's this blind expectation on how things should be here right now and we are forgetting the human interactions in between.

    "As Evan Williams, a co-founder of Twitter, recently put it, “Convenience decides everything.” Convenience seems to make our decisions for us, trumping what we like to imagine are our true preferences. (I prefer to brew my coffee, but Starbucks instant is so convenient I hardly ever

    I personally am getting more and more concerned with our heavier reliance on convenience. There's this blind expectation on how things should be here right now and we are forgetting the human interactions in between.

    "As Evan Williams, a co-founder of Twitter, recently put it, “Convenience decides everything.” Convenience seems to make our decisions for us, trumping what we like to imagine are our true preferences. (I prefer to brew my coffee, but Starbucks instant is so convenient I hardly ever do what I “prefer.”) Easy is better, easiest is best."

  • The modern world, call it increasing convenience if you like, is building systematic mundane swim lanes for individuals. Everything that once was a struggle is automated and to fill the rest of the day you possess at your fingertips an endless stream of television, games and social media updates. This preprograms individuals to think in ways that are largely prescribed for the masses - dangerous and dreadful.

    As we gain connectivity, we are in many ways losing connection to ourselves and our fellow

    The modern world, call it increasing convenience if you like, is building systematic mundane swim lanes for individuals. Everything that once was a struggle is automated and to fill the rest of the day you possess at your fingertips an endless stream of television, games and social media updates. This preprograms individuals to think in ways that are largely prescribed for the masses - dangerous and dreadful.

    As we gain connectivity, we are in many ways losing connection to ourselves and our fellow men.

    That being said, the things that actually matter if you seek them are still filled with struggle. Finding absolute quietness and seeking deep truths come with no shortcut - in fact with all the temptations in the modern world they seem far from one’s grasp.

    To help the youth to combat the flatness of modern life, we simply must increase awareness of philosophy. And we must help them focus on hard problems to solve, so their eyes stay bright!

  • There are some good points, but I have a very hard time with "suffering is good for the soul" arguments. There shouldn't be lines to vote. The reason they exist is purely the creation of people who are intentionally introducing irritation to push people out of voting because they want fewer people voting.

    Also, it is obvious Tim Wu has never had to launder a load of clothes by hand. Did he consider the fact the majority of these chores are still completed by women, even with these additional tools

    There are some good points, but I have a very hard time with "suffering is good for the soul" arguments. There shouldn't be lines to vote. The reason they exist is purely the creation of people who are intentionally introducing irritation to push people out of voting because they want fewer people voting.

    Also, it is obvious Tim Wu has never had to launder a load of clothes by hand. Did he consider the fact the majority of these chores are still completed by women, even with these additional tools of convenience? Thankfully, the average woman spends half the time on housework today that they did in the 60s.

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