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How to Buy a Gun in 15 Countries

By The New York Times

Many Americans can buy a gun in less than an hour. In some countries, the process takes monthsRead full story

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  • Gun deaths in Japan:

    2016: 5

    2015: 1

    2014: 6

    2013: 6

    2012: 4

    USA annual average is about 33,000.

  • My family owns rifles. When my parents die, they will pass to me and I will keep them, safely stored away. I say rifles because in the US, we tend to say guns as if all guns were the same.

    I was taught that guns are tools, built with purpose. And that the only purpose of a handgun or automatic was the death of a human being. To own one is to have decided you are willing to kill a person.

    Where I grew up, some people hunted for food. I support their right to do that. All of them would have been

    My family owns rifles. When my parents die, they will pass to me and I will keep them, safely stored away. I say rifles because in the US, we tend to say guns as if all guns were the same.

    I was taught that guns are tools, built with purpose. And that the only purpose of a handgun or automatic was the death of a human being. To own one is to have decided you are willing to kill a person.

    Where I grew up, some people hunted for food. I support their right to do that. All of them would have been willing to wait months for the ability to do so.

    We need to stop pretending that gun law is hard or complex. No handguns. No automatics, semi or otherwise. Rifles, appropriate for hunting only, after comprehensive checks and with careful storage and training requirements.

  • The US is on the wrong side of this analysis, but also note that even the best intended laws can mean nothing without adequate enforcement. (Cf. Russia.)

  • Ethan LaCroix
    Ethan LaCroixWriter and editor

    Mexico has much more restrictive laws than the US, but a much higher firearm homicide rate. I know this is cynical, but won't adapting the strictest gun laws in the US be a futile ''put the toothpaste back in the tube" measure unless there's an effort to do something about the guns that are already out there, which even the strongest advocates for gun control have shown no political appetite for? I don't know what the answer is here, but it seems like adapting the Japan model tomorrow won't change anything.

  • Adaora Udoji
    Adaora Udoji

    This should be common knowledge in every discussion/debate. Americans should know this, the context be considered as we figure out policies that make sense.

  • This is really interesting, politics aside.

  • Khaled Abdelhady
    Khaled AbdelhadySoftware engineer at Amazon.com

    I believe each country is completely different and hence will have different gun laws.

    Local and state governments should take the first step as they can obtain better support for laws from the local communities.

  • I try not to get in the gun debate, but I will tell you that I recently bought a gun and it was easier and faster than when I pumped gas on the way home.

  • Sumeet Shah
    Sumeet ShahBacking brands at Swiftarc Ventures

    Yemen is the second highest rate of gun ownership after the USA. Gun owners in the States are on board with tighter requirements. The question is: which country do we want to emulate in new processes?

  • Phillip Lipscy indulges in a faulty and misleading tactic: comparing gun homicides instead of total homicides.

    I don't even own a gun, and don't much care about gun control either way, but this sort of biased use of statistics bothers me. Surely someone teaching political science at one of America's top universities can argue honestly?

  • The US and Yemen - so much in common when it comes to getting a gun. It’s instant.

  • Anna  Konstantinova
    Anna Konstantinova

    Tied with Yemen. We can do better folks.

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