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Pets don’t make humans immediately happy the way other people do

By Quartz

As much as we love our doggos and feline friends, the thing that seems to actually make us happiest is the company of other peopleRead full story

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  • It requires work no matter what...pets or people...

    The bonding process takes time...but worth it in both cases...

    Full disclosure...I am a happily married man, w/ a baby daughter...& 2 dogs...they are collectively the center of my universe.

  • People who were surveyed clearly never met my kitteh, Sir James.

  • This is a terrible study, from an empirical standpoint, and the headline is just clickbait. But check out the comments of pickers, who immediately leap to the defense of animals - that’s the real story, the predictable irrational bit.

    The study measured two parts of happiness: satisfaction (the long

    This is a terrible study, from an empirical standpoint, and the headline is just clickbait. But check out the comments of pickers, who immediately leap to the defense of animals - that’s the real story, the predictable irrational bit.

    The study measured two parts of happiness: satisfaction (the long term experience of happiness) and delight (the momentary experience of happiness). But is that the right way to talk about happiness in the context of relationships? Is how we relate to living things supposed to make us happy?

    Their are numerous, more rigorous studies that show their children are bad for our lifelong happiness (romantic partner are good, though). When parents read the results of those studies, they vigorously deny them, just like the pet owners are here. But the real answer is that happiness is just a pretty poor ruler for thinking about whether something is worth doing. We would do better to stop deluding ourselves into arguing with the science of happiness and instead begin to recognize that we may be measuring the wrong thing.

  • Hmmm, despite what my good chum Dom Chu says (and he’s a much better human than me, so consider the source), I would move pets higher on the list; each member of my family covets the dog’s affection more than anyone else’s, we also derive a ton of pleasure from

    being greeted every day as if we’d been

    Hmmm, despite what my good chum Dom Chu says (and he’s a much better human than me, so consider the source), I would move pets higher on the list; each member of my family covets the dog’s affection more than anyone else’s, we also derive a ton of pleasure from

    being greeted every day as if we’d been missing st sea for months and presumes dead. Not saying pets (forget cats) should be tops but perhaps equal footing.

  • I don't agree - dogs and babies need their own category

  • Is this supposed to be a surprising finding? But it does make me think of all the studies around happiness and the correlation with meaningful relationships in life

  • C’mon, my cats used to make me instantly happy. I think it depends on the human being.

  • More stresses seem to come from relationships as well. I would say the headline is correct on some days with some people. So much more ups and downs with people. My old cat made me happy by him being just a cat, not a person.

  • I think a line should be drawn here between dogs and other trainable animals and non trainable animals. The satisfaction of building a relationship with a well trained dog vastly outstrips the satisfaction you can get from watching a tortoise crawl around and do nothing. Which isn't anything against

    I think a line should be drawn here between dogs and other trainable animals and non trainable animals. The satisfaction of building a relationship with a well trained dog vastly outstrips the satisfaction you can get from watching a tortoise crawl around and do nothing. Which isn't anything against tortoises, because they're kind of adorable, but there's a point where an animal ceases to be a pet and becomes a member of the family.

  • The headline is pretty controversial for an empirical study that, by nature, should be taken with a giant grain of salt. Also at a first glance, family is the second highest picked response. And those of you who have pets, refute me if you think I’m wrong, but pets are definitely family.

  • I have four pet crustaceans who would disagree with this article

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