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There Are Only 153 Days a Year When Work Actually Gets Done in Hollywood

By Vanity Fair

Most Hollywood players are familiar with working the room, working out, and working it—but a calendar filled with blackout dates can make it tough to actually workRead full story

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  • This reminds me of that stat that politicians spend 40% of their jobs fundraising. Reminds me of that Fugazi song, “I’m paid to stand around.” Reminds me of panhandling.

  • I knew there were a LOT of problems with this piece, but let’s start with the notion that it’s 79 degrees in October. October is now averaging mostly 87 degree days. Next, with the new streaming services, tv now runs all year. Most people do not take an entire day off for Halloween. Most parents are racing home to trick or treat at a decent hour. This piece is tongue and cheek, but it really ignores the people in this industry who actually work nonstop. They’re in an office all day and have to attend

    I knew there were a LOT of problems with this piece, but let’s start with the notion that it’s 79 degrees in October. October is now averaging mostly 87 degree days. Next, with the new streaming services, tv now runs all year. Most people do not take an entire day off for Halloween. Most parents are racing home to trick or treat at a decent hour. This piece is tongue and cheek, but it really ignores the people in this industry who actually work nonstop. They’re in an office all day and have to attend screenings and social events at night. On-set hours are minimally 12, but typically go over. About 85% of SAG-AFTRA members would love to work more. We postpone everything in our lives while we wait to hear if we booked something. I’m not sure who is abiding this schedule, but it isn’t the agents, writers, producers, production/post production folks, caterers, transpo, and casting professionals I know.

  • I know this is a joke, but for whatever truth there is to it: Good for them!

  • Blackout dates—to Hollywood-types, they don’t mean the same thing as to us mere mortals.

  • “April is pretty great,” says the film exec. “Wide open.”

    After everything that happened with Harvey Weinstein, maybe film execs shouldn't say things like "April is pretty great. Wide open."

  • Isn't this true to some degree in most business verticals? Thanksgiving through year end is a dead period for getting any deals done, as are the first few weeks of the year when folks are getting back into the swing of things. Other verticals might not have 'awards season' and film festivals to deal with, but there'll be industry conferences to prepare for and set product rollouts around (i.e. CES). And at least in Hollywood, the festivals and whatnot double as vacation; the rest of us 'mortals

    Isn't this true to some degree in most business verticals? Thanksgiving through year end is a dead period for getting any deals done, as are the first few weeks of the year when folks are getting back into the swing of things. Other verticals might not have 'awards season' and film festivals to deal with, but there'll be industry conferences to prepare for and set product rollouts around (i.e. CES). And at least in Hollywood, the festivals and whatnot double as vacation; the rest of us 'mortals' are likely to take time off in the summer, which makes it tough to get deals done because key players can be missing any time for 3-4 months.

    We're all facing the same plague.

  • This only makes sense if you don't count film production, writing, editing, acting, producing, and doing press as "work." It reminds me of when I was a theatre major in college and people insinuated that it was a "party" major because it's a fine art. Most of us had a full load of classes, part-time jobs, 5-10 hours of labs, and 20 hours of rehearsals a week. Didn't leave much time to party. I'm detecting a similar dismissive tone in this piece's characterization of Hollywood's work ethic. Makes for an interesting read, though.

  • As a former assistant at CAA, I need to call malarkey on this from an agent standpoint. Maybe this stands for the film world but when I worked for a TV Lit agent we didn’t have nearly this much goof off time.

  • This story has a pretty particular idea of work. Trick-or-treating is after all pretty harrowing affair. Also I wonder how much leisure those festivals and parties are for those expected to clock in every year.

  • Everyone I know or have worked with in Hollywood is constantly working.

  • The way this is written, you’d think people in the entertainment business don’t work 12-18 hour days regularly (which they do) and that dinners, drinks, festivals, and even picking a kid up at preschool aren’t actually networking events (which they are).

  • this is incredibly in depth and it's crazy

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