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Why hasn’t the gay community had a #MeToo moment? | Michael Segalov

Why hasn’t the gay community had a #MeToo moment? | Michael Segalov

Read more on Guardian (US)

Contributions

  • My straightness does not allow me to give this the absolutely necessary and careful attention it deserves, but I speak pretty candidly about the black and brown women forgotten by the #MeToo movement on a consistent basis yet even I can admit that, for whatever reason, the number of gay men affected

    My straightness does not allow me to give this the absolutely necessary and careful attention it deserves, but I speak pretty candidly about the black and brown women forgotten by the #MeToo movement on a consistent basis yet even I can admit that, for whatever reason, the number of gay men affected never quite crossed my mind. I'm not really sure why. I'd imagine it is based off this very archaic patriarchic hierarchy kind of thought process in which we constantly see women as vessels to either be used by men or appreciated by men; and men as vessels that either use women or appreciate women. We're very much trapped in a mindsite that views all forced sexual interactions as gender binary so at no point would one man's treatment of another man be automatically called into question.

    Perhaps I'm grossly over thinking it, but either way this is something that warrants a conversation of its own.

  • When gay white men start fighting for #metoo to bring black women into the fold, and fight for us, then I'll start fighting for them not to forget about gay white men. Until then you can miss me with all this. I don't think people should be hurt but I won't add on to the deliberate discrimination against

    When gay white men start fighting for #metoo to bring black women into the fold, and fight for us, then I'll start fighting for them not to forget about gay white men. Until then you can miss me with all this. I don't think people should be hurt but I won't add on to the deliberate discrimination against black women. That's 100% not happening.

  • I think it's essential that the me too movement from its beginnings is wholly inclusive of every victim of sexual violence regardless of race, sexuality, or anything else. As a straight man myself I definitely can't say I understand for certain but I know from the straight perspective there are definitely

    I think it's essential that the me too movement from its beginnings is wholly inclusive of every victim of sexual violence regardless of race, sexuality, or anything else. As a straight man myself I definitely can't say I understand for certain but I know from the straight perspective there are definitely unfair stigmas associated with queer sexuality. These kind of stigmas keep people from speaking up for fear of the same kind of victim blaming and persecution that we see female victims go through on a consistent basis. There shouldn't even be a need to increase the number of people able to accuse because every American citizen should already have the right to see their assailants fairly tried without their gender or sexuality being a factor. Now I'll be the first to agree there are issues with the way the general public so quickly assumes guilt as soon as a person is accused but the answer to that cannot be the exclusion of potential victims.

  • All of this is important but do we really want to increase the number of people that can falsely indict others with sexual harassment claims? We're losing site of due process. I think we need to figure out the kinks with our current me too movement before we start applying it to others.