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The Massive Prize Luring Miners to the Stars

The Massive Prize Luring Miners to the Stars

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Contributions

  • A real-life sci-fi story. Reminds me of the Ray Bradbury tales I read as a kid. But I still don't see the economic case for mining asteroids. When you see how many rail cars it takes to move iron ore and iron ingots to smelters and mills, I wonder how much it would cost to safely bring these heavy piles

    A real-life sci-fi story. Reminds me of the Ray Bradbury tales I read as a kid. But I still don't see the economic case for mining asteroids. When you see how many rail cars it takes to move iron ore and iron ingots to smelters and mills, I wonder how much it would cost to safely bring these heavy piles of metal back to earth. Unfortunately, the article makes no mention of the economics of space mining, and more importantly, bringing these metals back to earth.

  • Interesting view of NASA's OSIRIS-Rex mission, but we're a long way off from mining yet (this is a seven-year mission to return up to 2,000 grams). But it is exciting to think of the possibilities! Personally It's cool to think maybe we can eventually use materials in space to 3-D print parts to enable

    Interesting view of NASA's OSIRIS-Rex mission, but we're a long way off from mining yet (this is a seven-year mission to return up to 2,000 grams). But it is exciting to think of the possibilities! Personally It's cool to think maybe we can eventually use materials in space to 3-D print parts to enable further exploration. More about the mission at: https://www.nasa.gov/content/osiris-rex-overview

  • For travelers there is a company called World View. I don’t understand the valuations, based on what? Volume, scarcity, etc. It appears there is no known way to mine today at this minute, I would call that one serious barrier to entry. The is wholly speculative and a necessary exploration. I hope it’s

    For travelers there is a company called World View. I don’t understand the valuations, based on what? Volume, scarcity, etc. It appears there is no known way to mine today at this minute, I would call that one serious barrier to entry. The is wholly speculative and a necessary exploration. I hope it’s done reasonably in time, resources and money.

  • A single asteroid is worth 192x the GDP of Earth! Incredible.

    The irony of valuing those gold mines of the stars floating around our solar system, is that it's not their raw materials which provide the most long term economic benefits. It's the water, used to make rocket fuel. So we can refuel things

    A single asteroid is worth 192x the GDP of Earth! Incredible.

    The irony of valuing those gold mines of the stars floating around our solar system, is that it's not their raw materials which provide the most long term economic benefits. It's the water, used to make rocket fuel. So we can refuel things in space. You get the idea.

    In fact, those very resources would undoubtedly have a significant negative impact on our planetary economy (oversupply). I suspect that regulators would step in to place extreme limitations on the ability to bring the abundance of resources out there back to earth. Which is fine.

    We are much better served keeping them in space to develop the infrastructure and technologies needed for the next generation of inner-planetary exploration.

  • Fascinating peek into the future. It’s exciting to consider what industries and jobs will spring up that we can’t even fathom (as if you told a person you were going to be a data scientist...in 1932).