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How Developers Can Reduce Toxicity in Online Communities

How Developers Can Reduce Toxicity in Online Communities

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Contributions

  • If we force our avatars to develop more empathy, hopefully we‘ll engender the same in ourselves. And in fact that has been proven by research, which found that we mimic one another’s facial expressions and only then feel the emotions attached to the facial expression.

  • As a game developer who is active in the gaming community, I went into this piece skeptical that they would have any realistic solutions. I was wrong. I appreciate the mechanisms they suggested and think they have a good chance to make a difference. I will be following those developers closely as they

    As a game developer who is active in the gaming community, I went into this piece skeptical that they would have any realistic solutions. I was wrong. I appreciate the mechanisms they suggested and think they have a good chance to make a difference. I will be following those developers closely as they move forward and will be sharing this with my friends.

  • I'm surprised at how much of the conversation in this article is about letting "bad" people back into these games after they've been kicked out if they pass tests or (essentially) apologize.

    I'm all for rehabilitation, but playing specific video games doesn't seem like a basic right. Shouldn't threatening

    I'm surprised at how much of the conversation in this article is about letting "bad" people back into these games after they've been kicked out if they pass tests or (essentially) apologize.

    I'm all for rehabilitation, but playing specific video games doesn't seem like a basic right. Shouldn't threatening to rape someone be a "one strike and you're out" kind of thing? I'd think policies like that might deter the "toxic" people from acting out or even entering the game in the first place.

  • No one has time for unkind spaces online or irl.

  • The article points out that “..debunking a key myth about online behavior: the long-held belief that someone acts like an asshole because they’re hiding behind a fake name. Real-name policies don’t necessarily enforce good behavior” and that’s totally correct. For some reason these days it’s perfectly

    The article points out that “..debunking a key myth about online behavior: the long-held belief that someone acts like an asshole because they’re hiding behind a fake name. Real-name policies don’t necessarily enforce good behavior” and that’s totally correct. For some reason these days it’s perfectly acceptable to wear your ugly and narcissism on the outside with pride. I am so glad the gaming community is working to make serious consequences for bad behavior. Might not work on everyone but it will change the attitude of serious gamers for sure.

  • I’ve always associated anonymity with toxic trolling behavior, so I'm both disappointed and interested in the way that it’s not really an important part of the solution. Ethan’s notion of prevention before rehabilitation is so appealing to me, but I don’t know how we weed those behaviors out. I wonder

    I’ve always associated anonymity with toxic trolling behavior, so I'm both disappointed and interested in the way that it’s not really an important part of the solution. Ethan’s notion of prevention before rehabilitation is so appealing to me, but I don’t know how we weed those behaviors out. I wonder how many players are going into these worlds planning to violate other people vicariously, and how many (perhaps younger players) are just experimenting with different versions of themselves there and taking a bad turn. Should we concentrate all the players who are intent on (or just curious about) this conduct into one or two permissive scenes? Won’t they all just decide to meet up IRL in Charlottesville? I think the players who are truly in play here are the ones capable of bad conduct but who might learn something from the responsible, imaginative, collaborative majority. It means having to tolerate some terrible choices, and then, YES, making them reflect on why they did that and how they might better deserve to belong to this community.