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CEO corner

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

Money, money, money

Live from the International Astronautical Congress

The business of travel

Marking 30 years of the web

The latest on Brexit

WeWork gets worse

SoftBank takes over WeWork. The board of the shared office company chose the Japanese conglomerate over a competing offer from JP Morgan, the Wall Street Journal reports. Co-founder Adam Neumann will lose control of WeWork—but get a $1.7 billion payout.

Neumann to Get Up to $1.7 Billion to Exit WeWork as SoftBank Takes Control

Being a big fan of WeWork’s service, it is sad to see the devaluation hitting this level. Moreover, the payout to Adam N is beyond silly for a company that is going to need a major structural face lift.

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed to unrealistic valuations.

And now SoftBank will have to live with the creature it helped create...

India's coal addiction

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet. Quartz explores how India is meeting the challenge of providing increasing amounts of energy to its people while trying to lower its dependence on fossil fuels. ✦

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular, has other motivations: from energy security to soft power.

Making immigration work

Time to get lost in a museum...

New York's MoMA has reopened and it's a whole new experience. After the 90-year old institution’s $450-million expansion, it’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing.

It’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing

MoMA used to be my favorite museum in New York and now it's my favorite by a long shot. Aside from a few placings that feel designed for content creation (👀 surrealist section), this expansion is forward-thinking and inspired.

... and come back soon

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How Facebook made it impossible to delete Facebook

How Facebook made it impossible to delete Facebook

Read more on VOX

From Our Members

  • I want to know if you quit Facebook. And if you want to quit, but won’t, I want to know why.

    Me: I can’t quit Facebook because 1) as a freelancer, I find 75% of my work via a few networking groups I’m in, and 2) I get 100% of my sanity as a parent from a very supportive and tightknit moms group I’m

    I want to know if you quit Facebook. And if you want to quit, but won’t, I want to know why.

    Me: I can’t quit Facebook because 1) as a freelancer, I find 75% of my work via a few networking groups I’m in, and 2) I get 100% of my sanity as a parent from a very supportive and tightknit moms group I’m in. 3-6) All of the reasons outlined in this article.

    It’s scary… Facebook could do anything it wants to me. I am totally in its clutches.

  • I deactivated for about six weeks which was really refreshing, though occasionally inconvenient at work. I'm back on now, but I'm finding it easier to ignore.

    I think we're all too quick to declare a Last Straw these days (remember how many of those there were when Trump was running for President?!?)

    I deactivated for about six weeks which was really refreshing, though occasionally inconvenient at work. I'm back on now, but I'm finding it easier to ignore.

    I think we're all too quick to declare a Last Straw these days (remember how many of those there were when Trump was running for President?!?), so I don't know how accurate all the breathless "end of Facebook" declarations are. It's probably here to stay.

    But I also think everything in this article is only as strong as the users who keep propping them up. If even just a handful of people stop doing party invites, photo sharing, social groups, etc and move those behaviors other places (email, group texts, whatever), I imagine it will all crumble quickly.

  • Even if I could delete Facebook, there’s no point because Facebook still can track me and own my data in so many other ways. In any case, I can’t delete Facebook because of events and reconnecting with old friends.

  • One way I would cut out more time from Facebook: Build a separate app just for Facebook friends' birthdays.

  • Facebook is a huge part of my job and life (I’m a freelancer like Jane). Also, I already know and have accepted my data is out there. Everyone is mining it all the time. Netflix knows what movies I watch. The grocery store knows what toothpaste I buy. Google knows basically everything else there is to

    Facebook is a huge part of my job and life (I’m a freelancer like Jane). Also, I already know and have accepted my data is out there. Everyone is mining it all the time. Netflix knows what movies I watch. The grocery store knows what toothpaste I buy. Google knows basically everything else there is to to know about me. They way I see it, I can either freak out or evolve with society.

  • I can’t quit—as someone who grew up on three different continents and attempts to keep in touch with folks all over the globe, Facebook is really the easiest and most “universal” way to stay connected to people, for better or worse. I mean, I suppose there’s email, but it just feels too close to work to be enjoyable.

  • Facebook is like Hotel California.

  • I stopped using Facebook in 2013 (but also never deleted my profile). Based on an average viewing time of 50-60m a day that’s 76 days of my life I invested in other places. Recommend

  • I’m in the same boat in that much of the networking I do is reliant on Facebook. I’ve also made a number of very close friends via Facebook groups in the last year, and it’s the main way I stay in touch with them since we’re scattered across the country.

    But more than anything I always just assumed

    I’m in the same boat in that much of the networking I do is reliant on Facebook. I’ve also made a number of very close friends via Facebook groups in the last year, and it’s the main way I stay in touch with them since we’re scattered across the country.

    But more than anything I always just assumed they were taking my data. I knew what I signed up for. Perhaps it’s because I grew up with the internet, but I was always taught that anything on the internet was easily accessible to anyone. So while troubling, these sorts of revelations are never new information to me.

  • I feel pretty baffled by everyone’s outrage about Cambridge Analytica’s access to and use of data. I assume everything I do with FB or Instagram will be used for marketing things to me, and that this is why I get to stalk my exes for free. Not that I do that. I don’t. Also, I enjoy speculating on why

    I feel pretty baffled by everyone’s outrage about Cambridge Analytica’s access to and use of data. I assume everything I do with FB or Instagram will be used for marketing things to me, and that this is why I get to stalk my exes for free. Not that I do that. I don’t. Also, I enjoy speculating on why some products are specifically marketed to me. Why has Someone been trying so hard to sell me some of those panties that I can pee in a little bit? Is this the first approach to some kind political reorientation? Will I eventually start to see some ads that encourage me to mail my peed-in panties to the White House? Oh, probably. But I’ll still get to watch my friends’ kids putting funny things up their noses or their dogs being adorably confused by snow. Worth it.

  • I think about quitting Facebook all the time, but it usually amounts to nothing more than a large “unfriending” purge. My husband has never used the app and as much as that seems like a fish walking on land he somehow manages to function totally fine.

    Wouldn’t it be nice if there was an app that only

    I think about quitting Facebook all the time, but it usually amounts to nothing more than a large “unfriending” purge. My husband has never used the app and as much as that seems like a fish walking on land he somehow manages to function totally fine.

    Wouldn’t it be nice if there was an app that only allowed a few hours of FB use per day and then it would lock you out of your account once you’ve maxed out your time? Personally, I feel like we would all be a lot healthier psychologically.

  • 2) For many people, using Facebook regularly is a required part of their job or education. I agree with this. I can’t really delete Facebook since a part of my job pretty much requires it. I think that this is a pretty big bump for them that they need to fix, but kudos to them for making the platform

    2) For many people, using Facebook regularly is a required part of their job or education. I agree with this. I can’t really delete Facebook since a part of my job pretty much requires it. I think that this is a pretty big bump for them that they need to fix, but kudos to them for making the platform so sticky to many customers.

  • Jane Borden summed it up perfectly though I don’t do the dad’s equivalent of her mom’s group, though I might if there was a humorous one. It’s a lot like giving up your iPhone when you own about 6 other Apple products that you assume all talk to one another and will rebel and explode if you dared bring

    Jane Borden summed it up perfectly though I don’t do the dad’s equivalent of her mom’s group, though I might if there was a humorous one. It’s a lot like giving up your iPhone when you own about 6 other Apple products that you assume all talk to one another and will rebel and explode if you dared bring a Samsung in to the house.

    Also Vox is wrong, it wasn’t a bloody breach. It was someone who was granted access taking more than they were supposed to. Semantics maybe, but important none the less

  • I’m not leaving. It’s too imperative to my work and life right now. I feel like this will all blow over probably?

  • “At this point, “Why don’t you just delete Facebook” is the internet’s equivalent of asking, “Why didn’t they just leave before the hurricane came” — because it vastly misrepresents how embedded Facebook is at every cultural turn most of us take, and deflects social responsibility away from Facebook

    “At this point, “Why don’t you just delete Facebook” is the internet’s equivalent of asking, “Why didn’t they just leave before the hurricane came” — because it vastly misrepresents how embedded Facebook is at every cultural turn most of us take, and deflects social responsibility away from Facebook onto the users who have been directly impacted by the company’s lack of accountability.”

    #3 is truly spot-on for me, especially as a single traveler. I love engaging in political debates and stuff on Facebook because it’s fun for me and a way to pass time, but what really holds me in FB’s clutches is the social aspect. I’m so awful at keeping in touch with damn near everyone, so this is a way for me to reach out without the awkward “sorry I suck for not calling/texting/emailing... I haven’t fallen off the planet...” and I feel like my friends are a little more comfortable saying a quick hi to me on FB, too. There’s no extra pressure.

    But my morals and ethics are starting to scream at me. What will be the straw that breaks the camel’s back, or can FB redeem itself in enough time to retain its user base? Will there be another platform waiting in the wings to welcome defectors with open arms??

  • Face more books. That would be really helpful for productivity and in increasing one’s knowledge.