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Why (almost) everything reported about the Cambridge Analytica Facebook ‘hacking’ controversy is…

Why (almost) everything reported about the Cambridge Analytica Facebook ‘hacking’ controversy is…

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  • Stories about the evils of Facebook get plenty of commentary on NewsPicks and elsewhere but only one other pick for this article. Says something about the psychology of sharing, doesn’t it? Life is a feature story, not an investigative report and so too is the way we share information.

  • I made several of these same points at the NewsPicks Live event last week, I began by saying that it wasn’t a breach. I also tried to explain that the apps are granted permission by users to see their friends data. Users are quick to agree to the rules which allow them to use their FB logins to gain

    I made several of these same points at the NewsPicks Live event last week, I began by saying that it wasn’t a breach. I also tried to explain that the apps are granted permission by users to see their friends data. Users are quick to agree to the rules which allow them to use their FB logins to gain access to other apps and then cry wolf when they find out they granted the bloody permission in the first place. Kudos to this writer!

  • Interesting read about the Cambridge Analytica incident. Seeing so much of news the past week, i never really understood fully how genius these Cambridge Analytica guys are in their manipulative power. But according to his analysis, there is so little evidence that the company can do what it claims to do.

  • Perfect example of modern sensationalism. Definitely worth picking to ease some of the hysteria.

  • This article paints a much more convincing picture than the popular narrative: two companies taking the fall for common practice in a flawed, misunderstood, and under-regulated area of business. Facebook and Cambridge Analytica were two of many navigating a grey area of business and just happened to

    This article paints a much more convincing picture than the popular narrative: two companies taking the fall for common practice in a flawed, misunderstood, and under-regulated area of business. Facebook and Cambridge Analytica were two of many navigating a grey area of business and just happened to be the ones who were bit by mis-informed journalists.

    I think the real takeaway here is that we need generally agreed upon technical definitions for technological terms like “hack”, “data”, and “scraping“. When there is an established definition that legal systems use, lawmakers, journalists, and the public can glean more knowledge from a conflict. But more importantly, better technical definitions can prevent misinterpretation of a story to fit into a certain narrative.

  • Unsure why the author is trying so hard to minimize the wrongdoings of CA. In any case, everyone can watch the undercover videos of Alexander Nix & Co. and decide for themselves.

  • Interesting read, but anyone who’s been reading about this in places besides the Guardian has a pretty clear understanding of the issue: Facebook collects reams of data on its users, and used to make a ton of that data available to so-called developers, with virtually no oversight. That means a credit

    Interesting read, but anyone who’s been reading about this in places besides the Guardian has a pretty clear understanding of the issue: Facebook collects reams of data on its users, and used to make a ton of that data available to so-called developers, with virtually no oversight. That means a credit card firm may know I like collecting points and getting free vacations, so I may get turned down the next time I apply for a credit card.

    As to the effectiveness of the CA “mind control”, hard to know how well it worked. But it seems clear Russian trolls are able to influence behavior in the US, so perhaps CA’s work does have an effect.

  • Just more hair pulling over the results of the election.

  • This sets the record straight from the bombastic claims of hacking...

  • Another story that puts the misuse of Facebook data into perspective.