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Zack Rosebrugh

Good evening.

Up, up, and away

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

Saving WeWork

WeWork is getting a lifeline. SoftBank Group and JP Morgan both have plans to bail out the struggling office-sharing company, CNBC reports. WeWork's board will review the proposals by the end of the week and opt for one or a combination.

SoftBank, JP Morgan to submit separate WeWork bailout proposals in coming days

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors are surprised that they can’t get enough customers in the door to keep the lights on.

What I never hear discussed in these talk about wavering SV companies is whether customers are buying their product. Have you looked at the price of a spot in a WeWork office? It’s astronomical for someone starting a small business and apparently the current price point isn’t even enough to cover the costs of goods (I.e. office space) much less turn a profit. Golden toilets.

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given WeWork close to $11 billion, the company might be beyond rescue. Hard to say whether SoftBank's throwing good money after bad. Right now, all WeWork has going for it is the company's existing contracts & what's left of its brand. The next month will be intriguing to watch.

Quartz at work

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

US-China tech diplomacy

Apple users in China: Beware. Privacy advocates worry about the US tech giant’s partnership with Tencent, which has close ties to Beijing, as they think it could share the IP addresses of internet users who try to visit blacklisted sites.

Apple’s data sharing with firms tied to the Chinese government may endanger dissidents

Have you visited a fraudulent site? If so, you likely got a warning from Google. But in China, users get warnings from Tencent, a co. close to the Chinese government. Thus, a service meant to protect users could threaten their freedom. Staying safe (and private) is hard.

The World in 50 Years

Apple's Indian revival

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Locked up in America

Stop the presses

Surprising discovery

Come back soon!

Close
Facebook confirms it scans your conversations in its Messenger app

Facebook confirms it scans your conversations in its Messenger app

Read more on Business Insider

From Our Members

  • Is anyone really surprised that companies that grew this profitable this fast, steered by first time entrepreneurs with no formal training in risk and compliance are having to explain away their actions of the past decade. We are only seeing the tip of the iceberg with Facebook and Google. My tendency

    Is anyone really surprised that companies that grew this profitable this fast, steered by first time entrepreneurs with no formal training in risk and compliance are having to explain away their actions of the past decade. We are only seeing the tip of the iceberg with Facebook and Google. My tendency is to want to blame the board of advisors to the company, who were appointed to bring experience and governance to the table but probably spent too much time being sycophantic with their hands in the cash cows cookie jar.

  • Last week Facebook revealed it listens to audio and video calls through Facebook messenger. This week its CEO reveals that text in Facebook messages is scraped for data purposes to manage community standards.

    From Facebook’s community standards page, the terms state that “not all disagreeable or disturbing

    Last week Facebook revealed it listens to audio and video calls through Facebook messenger. This week its CEO reveals that text in Facebook messages is scraped for data purposes to manage community standards.

    From Facebook’s community standards page, the terms state that “not all disagreeable or disturbing content violates our Community Standards.” One could infer that Facebook has taken a subjective decision on how to employ data usage on its platform. Its data and privacy page further states that Facebook will not violate local law, which indicates that Facebook may skirt the line into morally grey data policies at the expense of privacy.

    What else do you think Facebook and leading technology companies are scanning, that you don’t know about yet?

  • After I talked about Blue Man with my wife on Messanger, Blue Man's ad showed up on my news feed. Is this a concidence?

  • These stories are bordering on fake news. Don’t you think the waiter at the restaurant you went to last night might have listened in on your conversation? That’s a human being nosy. These are computer algorithms flagging inappropriate content for fake profiles, blatant porn, and outright scams. There’s

    These stories are bordering on fake news. Don’t you think the waiter at the restaurant you went to last night might have listened in on your conversation? That’s a human being nosy. These are computer algorithms flagging inappropriate content for fake profiles, blatant porn, and outright scams. There’s a reason Facebook and most social media doesn’t look like MySpace.

  • From what I understand, “scan” in this case really isn’t tantamount to “reading.” Do you remember the story about Facebook asking to be sent nudes so it could block other people from sending them? This is like that. It’s a hashing function. It still has implications though as there’s nothing stopping

    From what I understand, “scan” in this case really isn’t tantamount to “reading.” Do you remember the story about Facebook asking to be sent nudes so it could block other people from sending them? This is like that. It’s a hashing function. It still has implications though as there’s nothing stopping them from looking at your stuff. WhatsApp is supposedly end to end encrypted though.

  • Oh dear God. This clearly will have to get worse before it gets better.

  • Wow.

  • I mean.. Google knows our exact location all the time... this is no secret. Oh and my Google Home started telling me about some information about SF all of sudden when I was talking to my friend about going to SF earlier that day outside home.. so this is no surprise.

  • this may be happening thought so

  • no! really!?