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Zack Rosebrugh

Good afternoon.

ETFs are eating the market

Mining for silver

Ford goes electric

What makes a car a Mustang? Ford's new all-electric Mustang Mach-E is a crossover SUV that the company hopes is as fun to drive as a muscle car. It's an existential crisis on wheels.

Ford is mortgaging its future on the value of its past

Since this is actually my area, let me try something.

The short: This vehicle ain't for you.

The long:

It doesn't matter that Mustang enthusiasts don't want to buy it. It really doesn't.

Take the Jeep Renegade or Compass or Patriot. No Jeep enthusiast who has ever owned a Wrangler or a Cherokee wants

Since this is actually my area, let me try something.

The short: This vehicle ain't for you.

The long:

It doesn't matter that Mustang enthusiasts don't want to buy it. It really doesn't.

Take the Jeep Renegade or Compass or Patriot. No Jeep enthusiast who has ever owned a Wrangler or a Cherokee wants one of those smaller vehicles. You want a real Jeep. The Renegade is made in Italy, for Pete's sake. These smaller vehicles are for brand newbies that want a name but have less money to spend. Funky colors that look good on Instagram. It doesn't damage the Jeep brand, it just makes it more available. I hate those cars, so do real Jeep people. Have people stopped buying Jeeps?

...No.

Ford isn't selling these to Mustang owners. Fact: The yearly volume of the current 2020 Mustang is 65,000+ vehicles, 25% or more are sold overseas. So your "Mustang Enthusiast" opinion is irrelevant. You might just have to accept that.

This vehicle is for Tech folks who like the IDEA of a Mustang but don't want to pay for gas. They live on the coasts, they are eco friendly, need a reason to buy a domestic brand, and have way more money to spend on a car than you. I know this because I saw the press briefings before all of you. I was there when they brought in focus groups. I've seen it assembled at NMPDC when it was still Body-in-White. Ford knows what they're doing, get over yourself.

Very little about this car makes sense to me. I'm not sure why Ford felt compelled to muddy the Mustang brand with a crossover vehicle that looks very little like a Mustang. But then again, Porsche and Lamborghini make SUVs now, so I guess anything goes. I'm not sure if there's enough here to sway anyone

Very little about this car makes sense to me. I'm not sure why Ford felt compelled to muddy the Mustang brand with a crossover vehicle that looks very little like a Mustang. But then again, Porsche and Lamborghini make SUVs now, so I guess anything goes. I'm not sure if there's enough here to sway anyone from a Tesla, nor from a gas-powered muscle car. Maybe some men in the throes of a mid-life crisis men who also want to save on gas, though.

Putting the name “mustang” on this car is a bad joke. When you hear “mustang Mach e” it calls to mind, obviously, an electric mustang. This car is decidedly NOT an electric mustang, it’s a completely separate EV inexplicably called a mustang. It’s a four-door crossover, not a two-door muscle car, and

Putting the name “mustang” on this car is a bad joke. When you hear “mustang Mach e” it calls to mind, obviously, an electric mustang. This car is decidedly NOT an electric mustang, it’s a completely separate EV inexplicably called a mustang. It’s a four-door crossover, not a two-door muscle car, and has nothing in common aesthetically with a mustang anywhere.

None of this is to say that there’s anything actually wrong with the car— but it’s an absolute travesty of branding. Ford should’ve just come up with a new name for it. Mustang buyers wouldn’t even want this thing, and the name’s cachet does nothing for its target audience. All this does for Ford is irk their loyal mustang customers, confuse people who’d actually be interested in this car, and dilute their most recognizable brand.

Edit: to more specifically address Michael’s points, the problem isn’t that the name offends the Mustang’s greatness or anything— it’s that the car is so totally different from a Mustang that the name is just ridiculous. Porsche makes SUVs, but they don’t call them Carreras. Jeep makes that weird El Camino thing (gladiator, I think?) but they don’t call it a Wrangler.

If they’re not selling the car to “Mustang people” (and they obviously aren’t) why on Earth did they call it a Mustang?

The Mustang branding makes me want the car less. I’m not sure the typical Mustang demographic would care for a tech heavy SUV, and vice versa.

Why is the article so myopic? As if the whole world revolves around the US? Ford is a large company with a global presence - take a beat and think about the bigger picture, there are far more competitors in this space than just Tesla in the US. Look further afield and you may find open roads with consumers

Why is the article so myopic? As if the whole world revolves around the US? Ford is a large company with a global presence - take a beat and think about the bigger picture, there are far more competitors in this space than just Tesla in the US. Look further afield and you may find open roads with consumers who are eager to take a drive with a storied American brand - Mustang enthusiast or not.

It's no secret that American cars lag behind with innovation and style - they even keep the same names for decades. The fact that they decided to call the electric SUV a Mustang tells me that they aren't confident about its success and at the very least figure they can get their same customers to go

It's no secret that American cars lag behind with innovation and style - they even keep the same names for decades. The fact that they decided to call the electric SUV a Mustang tells me that they aren't confident about its success and at the very least figure they can get their same customers to go electric even though Ford has always stood for gas guzzlers. It just seems like they want to give Tesla a hard time. Then in an NPR interview, the CEO started talking about Trump policies being beneficial to the company. That this unsolicited dialogue even happened tells me their heart isn't in this car, they know who their customers are, and that new buyers aren't racing to get one.

Take note

The beauty business

Kylie Jenner's $600 million payday. Coty, the century-old beauty company, is shelling out the big bucks for a 51% stake in the youngest Jenner's booming cosmetics business—and access to her 270 million social media followers.

Kylie Jenner’s $600 million deal proves the power of celebrity beauty brands

I definitely think that celebrity plays a MASSIVE factor in the success of a brand; however, it's not a surefire ticket to success. Look at Blake Lively's failed venture - Preserve. She has a huge following and people adore her and yet Preserve never took off and she shut it down. At the end of the day

I definitely think that celebrity plays a MASSIVE factor in the success of a brand; however, it's not a surefire ticket to success. Look at Blake Lively's failed venture - Preserve. She has a huge following and people adore her and yet Preserve never took off and she shut it down. At the end of the day, you still need to have product market fit even if you're a celebrity, but the audience is an enormous boost at launch because instead of having to pay to get millions of eyeballs, you just market to your already engaged followers which builds natural momentum, but without a great product - it doesn't matter how many followers you have, they're not going to buy something they don't want.

Estee Lauder made its first Asian beauty acquisition. The company agreed to buy the two-thirds stake it didn’t already own in Have & Be Co.—parent company of South Korea’s Dr. Jart+ cosmetics—for $1.1 billion.

Estee Lauder to acquire shares of Dr. Jart+ parent it does not already own

If you haven’t been keeping your eyes peeled, K-Beauty is where the money is at. If celebrities loved creating their own perfumes in the early 2000s and YouTube propelled “makeup gurus” in the mid-2000s, K-Beauty skincare is the next phase. Look at Kylie Jenner, Bella Thorne, Miranda Kerr, and soon to

If you haven’t been keeping your eyes peeled, K-Beauty is where the money is at. If celebrities loved creating their own perfumes in the early 2000s and YouTube propelled “makeup gurus” in the mid-2000s, K-Beauty skincare is the next phase. Look at Kylie Jenner, Bella Thorne, Miranda Kerr, and soon to be many other celebrities forging their own skincare lines. If today entails celebrity branded skincare, K-Beauty is the next top tier—and Estée Lauder is very well aware of that.

International education

Indian students are set on pursuing their US dreams. Overall, Indians studying in the US climbed by 3% in 2018-19 but graduate students were down 6%. The American dream is alive and kicking but the path is not as straightforward anymore.

Trump’s visa clampdown hasn’t stopped Indian students from pursuing their US dreams

The fee structure and the lack of work opportunities to actually get a return on investment is a big deterrant for students, unless they opt for specialised STEM courses. That’s only further going to diminish the importance of liberal arts and other professional courses.

The growth, though, is a marginal 3%. The only bright spot being optional practical training.

Global health challenges

India's economic prospects

About that trade war

What will we do?

AI has leveled the playing field for companies. However, Forbes notes how they use the new technology and why will be key differentiators.

What Is The Future Of Enterprise AI?

So true - there is such a great opportunity for AI in the enterprise. "Enterprises are beginning to understand the consequences of the evolving artificial intelligence-driven automation ecosystem far beyond narrow artificial intelligence, crossing economic, commerce, education, governance, and trade supply chains."

From the test kitchen

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Companies could soon scan YOUR body to detect your mood and health

Companies could soon scan YOUR body to detect your mood and health

Read more on Mail Online

From Our Members

  • If you ever have any sudden health issue two things become immediately clear. The human body is one of the few systems in the world that has no way to do a full system diagnostic that pinpoints a problem. Doctors have to run tests and scans to take an educated guess at what’s wrong with you. Then you

    If you ever have any sudden health issue two things become immediately clear. The human body is one of the few systems in the world that has no way to do a full system diagnostic that pinpoints a problem. Doctors have to run tests and scans to take an educated guess at what’s wrong with you. Then you realize the second thing. Most doctors aren’t very good at taking educated guesses or what’s called in medicine, triaging a problem.

  • Growing up I remember watching reruns of Star Trek: The Next Generation and marveling at the technology. In particular I remember the health technology - body scanners that could detect and diagnose illness with a quick body scan. And each time over the past couple of decades that technology imagined

    Growing up I remember watching reruns of Star Trek: The Next Generation and marveling at the technology. In particular I remember the health technology - body scanners that could detect and diagnose illness with a quick body scan. And each time over the past couple of decades that technology imagined by the various Star Trek series became reality, I would excitedly look forward to what would come next. But being a part of the first generation of Facebook users (and an avid MySpace user before that) I now have nearly two decades’ worth of personal data floating around the internet. We all hopefully now understand the risks we take in putting our information online, though how to prevent data we do not want released from getting out there remains a mystery to many. And if we’ve learned anything from Mark Zuckerberg’s interview with congress this week, regulation, and even the understanding of what it is that needs to be regulated, is even more woefully lacking that we ever believed. What regulations that can be imposed would likely be outdated before they even passed the House. So this news does not bring to mind the beneficial health technology of Star Trek. Rather, it is a clear look into a future in which our autonomy and ability to decide what pieces of ourselves can be given away to aid companies in their quest for profits will be completely taken away.

  • This type of diagnostic is used in lie detector when people are interrogated or work to achieve clearance security status.

  • < Technology >

    Combined with the current Facebook scandal, people should be worried that data privacy may soon pose danger to one's physical self should there be no regulation set in place. Whether the regulation is a blanket opt-in policy for user data, a line drawn between which data can be provided

    < Technology >

    Combined with the current Facebook scandal, people should be worried that data privacy may soon pose danger to one's physical self should there be no regulation set in place. Whether the regulation is a blanket opt-in policy for user data, a line drawn between which data can be provided, or a combination of both, the debate should be continued at the federal level.

  • I will bet my lunch that China is working on making this the next surveillance tool it implements across the country, starting in Xinjiang.

  • i vote that we don't do this

  • There are laws requiring search warrants before intrusive searches of citizen's homes; indiscriminate searching of a person and sharing of those results is terrifying. I can opt-out of wearing a device, body scans at airports, CAT scans. I absolutely need a way to opt-out of this type of scanner

  • We are so not there. Not crazy to think we will get there, but our technology has real limits and accurately measuring mood is among them.

  • Yes. Painless diagnostics are the future.