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Michael George Haddad

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Pay and play

Board games are back in India. Indian children once learned ethics and life lessons from simpler activities, until PUBG came along.

Children once learned ethics and life lessons from board games—then PUBG came along

As kids growing up in the 1990s, where India's liberalisation had only just become a reality, kids could play games without needing much paraphernalia. This takes me back to that time of unparalleled inventiveness.

Convenience and cost are the two biggest factors for why I allow my child to play a mobile game instead of a board game. Buying board games is an expensive affair now with most being imported to India. Also, most of the board games of my childhood are not available online for free. I recently realised

Convenience and cost are the two biggest factors for why I allow my child to play a mobile game instead of a board game. Buying board games is an expensive affair now with most being imported to India. Also, most of the board games of my childhood are not available online for free. I recently realised that Ludo on Android is a pretty popular game.

I guess, we need to move on with times and try to find e-games that teach ethics and life lessons because it's nearly impossible to keep kids away from technology now.

The simplest way to help young kids is to pay their teachers better. There is a large body of evidence that tells us good early education and support leads to better economic outcomes. But teachers remain chronically underpaid, harming children's chances.

The simplest way to help young kids is to pay their teachers better

Do you remember who your preschool teacher was? In all likelihood, you don't. But that doesn't mean they weren't hugely significant in shaping who you are today. I cover early childhood development, and the basic principle of decades of research in ECD is that the best investment a government can make

Do you remember who your preschool teacher was? In all likelihood, you don't. But that doesn't mean they weren't hugely significant in shaping who you are today. I cover early childhood development, and the basic principle of decades of research in ECD is that the best investment a government can make is in improving vulnerable kids' early years (roughly between birth and six) because that's when 90% of brain development happens. And yet early educators and care staff and under-paid, under-valued, under-trained, and over-worked almost everywhere in the world. A new report from the OECD shows there is nuance in that picture though, and it's all about pay scale progression. If you receive a pittance when you start out but know that you have the possibility of earning a lot more as time goes on, there's a chance you'll stick it out. But if you'll make almost the same thing starting out as you will 15 years into your career, that's not going to motivate you. See where your country stacks up on this chart and let me know your thoughts below!

According to certain ways of thinking, only CEOs and investment bankers are motivated by financial incentives. But market forces work across the the income spectrum, and you think the promise of stock options will recruit, retain, and motivate tech workers, then you should support higher pay for teachers.

Capitalism and its discontents

🇺🇸 2020 🗳️

They're coming for your wallet

How Zuckerberg plans to make money with Facebook Pay. Even as it drives deeper into commerce and digital transactions, which hasn't always gone well, Facebook is likely to rely on ads as its main money-maker for the foreseeable future.

How Mark Zuckerberg plans to make money with Facebook Pay

When I talk to people about Facebook's drive into payments, they often think it's because the company wants to diversify beyond ads. But a review of earnings calls shows that that's not what Zuckerberg has in mind—at least not anytime soon. Instead, he sees payments and commerce as a way to make Facebook ads even more valuable.

The new consumer

Porno for patriots

You really sailed through the news!

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Coordination on Syria Strikes Belies Simmering Tensions

Coordination on Syria Strikes Belies Simmering Tensions

Read more on The Wall Street Journal

From Our Members

  • You never know how much coordination was actually happening, but on the surface it looks like this was a collaboration of allies which is really needed. The US is a powerful country, but with good allies you can have better outcomes. Bombing anyone is nothing ever to celebrate, but hopefully in the long

    You never know how much coordination was actually happening, but on the surface it looks like this was a collaboration of allies which is really needed. The US is a powerful country, but with good allies you can have better outcomes. Bombing anyone is nothing ever to celebrate, but hopefully in the long run there are less attempts for any chemical attack. Nobody wins if more happen.

  • It’s actually quite stunning that these strikes were done in partnership. One consequence is that it seems like France and the UK are giving an implicit nod of approval to Trump in his hour of need.

  • I do not support bombing Syria. Syria is bombing Syria, so why should the US or anyone else bomb Syria? To top it off, we're not allowing refugees in this country from Syria either. That makes no sense to me and I do not support this behavior. The European people who founded this country were refugees

    I do not support bombing Syria. Syria is bombing Syria, so why should the US or anyone else bomb Syria? To top it off, we're not allowing refugees in this country from Syria either. That makes no sense to me and I do not support this behavior. The European people who founded this country were refugees themselves seeking religious freedom. I follow a little girl on Twitter named Bana, she must only be ten years old at the most, and she's more politically aware of the issues of her country (Syria) than anyone. She is constantly calling for peace and to end the war. There are so many children suffering from this war. Bloodied orphan children who probably wish they were dead instead of deal with the obstacles ahead of them. I say we listen to Bana and demand a cease fire. Save the children.

  • This situation with the missile strike in Syria is such a conflict for so many Americans. After reading the article, I can’t help but wonder if ordinary citizens in France and the UK also feel conflicted. The Wall Street Journal article is laser focused on the big picture, the diplomatic and political

    This situation with the missile strike in Syria is such a conflict for so many Americans. After reading the article, I can’t help but wonder if ordinary citizens in France and the UK also feel conflicted. The Wall Street Journal article is laser focused on the big picture, the diplomatic and political fallout from the strike and mission success (or lack there of). Most reporting on the matter is exactly the same. There’ absolutely nothing wrong with that but I want to dig deeper. As a reader and a concerned citizen I want to know what the average person on the street thinks. I struggle because I believe something needed to be done in Syria, yet I’m certain Trump’s motivation is most assuredly distraction at any cost. Thank goodness cooler heads prevailed and General Mattis is a serious, disciplined professional who understands the consequences of war. How does the progressive Londoner view the situation? How does the more Conservative Brexit supporter view the situation? What about the the average Parisian or those living in the French countryside?

  • The failure of Russia to even attempt to make good on its promise to shoot down our missiles troubles me. Putin is many awful things, but "all talk no action" isn't one of them.

    I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the US negotiated a deal with them that the strikes would do no serious damage to Assad

    The failure of Russia to even attempt to make good on its promise to shoot down our missiles troubles me. Putin is many awful things, but "all talk no action" isn't one of them.

    I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the US negotiated a deal with them that the strikes would do no serious damage to Assad in exchange for no Russian countermeasures. How else do you explain it?

  • Leftists will disagree with anything Trump does. Even if it is to enforce the red line that Obama put down.