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Harvard's longest study of adult life reveals how you can be happier and more successful

By CNBC

"It turns out that living in the midst of conflict is really bad for our healthRead full story

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  • Human beings are designed for connection! It’s encouraging to see hard research that corroborates what Christianity believes about purpose. Obviously this piece doesn’t address or even mention the benefits of active faith (like this other study from Harvard: https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/attending-religious-services-linked-to-longer-lives-study-shows), but it contains some of the same principles without explicitly mentioning congregational benefits or the likelihood of deep friendships

    Human beings are designed for connection! It’s encouraging to see hard research that corroborates what Christianity believes about purpose. Obviously this piece doesn’t address or even mention the benefits of active faith (like this other study from Harvard: https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/attending-religious-services-linked-to-longer-lives-study-shows), but it contains some of the same principles without explicitly mentioning congregational benefits or the likelihood of deep friendships being formed among believers. The two studies present a pretty strong case for faith-based involvement, let alone the numerous other studies that prove the health benefits of strong spiritual devotion. Since the general purpose of every person is to 1) be in relationship with God and 2) affect others in relationship to the world around us, it makes complete sense that this design is proven to make us the most fulfilled, healthy, and happy. As easy as it would be to insist on high-quality relationships in order to achieve this level of healthy connectedness, let’s instead focus our efforts on becoming people that help our significant others, family, and friends “feel they can count on their partner in times of need.” It is a fairly common sense principle as well as a Biblical one that we often reap what we sow, apart from the radical grace of God. Let us apply this principle in our relationships and take the initiative to become a protective factor for someone else’s health and happiness. We will surely see the return in our own lives as our “willingness to commit” to loved ones grows into something even more safe, mutual, and good for the soul.

  • Earlier today I listened to an episode of the podcast Part Time Genius where they discussed stress, it’s causes, how we manage it and the effects it has on health. Much of the research they presented mirrors what’s written here. People with healthy and loving relationships were better able to manage stress and were generally healthier. What’s interesting in both the studies in the podcast and the one outlined here is that, while people can be a source of stress, we’re healthier and better able to

    Earlier today I listened to an episode of the podcast Part Time Genius where they discussed stress, it’s causes, how we manage it and the effects it has on health. Much of the research they presented mirrors what’s written here. People with healthy and loving relationships were better able to manage stress and were generally healthier. What’s interesting in both the studies in the podcast and the one outlined here is that, while people can be a source of stress, we’re healthier and better able to deal with stress when we have good, stable relationships, but it’s becoming more difficult to develop those relationships, especially in adulthood. Our screen time and our inability to shut off our work at the end of the day or week means we’re more connected than ever but more likely to feel lonely or isolated. Hopefully this research has an impact on these things.

  • Relationships may be the answer. I really didn’t buy into this line of thinking for years. A decade ago I would have read this article, mildly appreciated it and moved on with my life. I can’t quite pinpoint exactly when, but at some point my perspective shifted. I started to notice the magic of relationships. I started to recognize not so subtle shifts in my life when I did the simplest of things. I would chat it up with the cashier at ShopRite or spend a few minutes talking to the guy who seemed

    Relationships may be the answer. I really didn’t buy into this line of thinking for years. A decade ago I would have read this article, mildly appreciated it and moved on with my life. I can’t quite pinpoint exactly when, but at some point my perspective shifted. I started to notice the magic of relationships. I started to recognize not so subtle shifts in my life when I did the simplest of things. I would chat it up with the cashier at ShopRite or spend a few minutes talking to the guy who seemed a little nuts at the gym. Those efforts genuinely made me feel happier and my life generally got better. Eventually I found an amazing person willing to marry me. Now, as my relationships get richer, I’m finding all types of mini and major successes in my life just happen. It seems to be well worth the effort.

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