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The Case for Universal Day Care

By The New Republic

Can America change the way it takes care of kidsRead full story

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  • Sabrina Price-Durling
    Sabrina Price-DurlingFinance at Dow Jones & Co.

    For a G-7 country with the large GDP we have, the US is embarrassingly behind on both Family Leave legislation and day care systems. It hits home personally. I refuse to curtail my career, so rather than “work to live”, I’ll “work for daycare”. It’s ridiculous.

  • Ernie Sander
    Ernie SanderDirector of Platform Community at Quartz

    How scary and anxiety-producing to be a working parent in, say, large swathes of Minnesota and literally have no options for places to take your kids for the day.

    But I can't imagine that a national daycare program, of the sort that existed after WWII, could ever get passed in the Washington of today. And if it did, it would quickly just become the next Obamacare (ie public policy-turned political punching bag). It feels like the era of the federal government as social welfare advocate is dead

    How scary and anxiety-producing to be a working parent in, say, large swathes of Minnesota and literally have no options for places to take your kids for the day.

    But I can't imagine that a national daycare program, of the sort that existed after WWII, could ever get passed in the Washington of today. And if it did, it would quickly just become the next Obamacare (ie public policy-turned political punching bag). It feels like the era of the federal government as social welfare advocate is dead. The daycare shortage will likely fall to some for-profit daycare chain (or chains) to figure out.

  • Marcela  Sapone
    Marcela SaponeCo-Founder & CEO at Hello Alfred

    Our roles in a family, our working hours are all going to change. What would be beautiful is to have childcare and senior care in the same location with some overlap.

  • Jason Liao
    Jason LiaoGrowth at WeWork

    This is a really interesting proposal because it would also help level the playing field / corporate stigma for working women who want to have children and aren't sure if they can re-enter the workforce because of cost / trust trade-off of letting someone else care for child during the day.

  • Fi Fi
    Fi Fi

    Day care in some places can cost $2000-$3000 a month (and yes, that’s for group day care, not a personal nanny). At this price point, you have women thinking there’s no point to working if their entire salary will be spent on childcare, so they leave the workforce to ask care of the kids until they’re old enough for school. If, not when, they return to the workforce, they’re behind the men who started working at the same time.

  • Cinthia  Loera
    Cinthia Loera

    Child care is definitely an issue that seems to be brushed off every year. It impacts so many families in the U.S. who have had one parent forced to stop working just because they couldn’t afford for both parents to work full time. This puts a strain on couples and causes them to stretch what little income they may receive to its absolute limit every month.

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