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We asked musicians why guitar companies like Gibson are struggling and how to revive them

We asked musicians why guitar companies like Gibson are struggling and how to revive them

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Contributions

  • it’s definitely not about ed sheeran popularizing acoustic guitars (gibson makes great acoustics) but rather that gibson tried to be a lifestyle brand and got into too many ancillary products. if they laser focus on being a guitar brand making great guitars they can go back to owning a valuable niche

    it’s definitely not about ed sheeran popularizing acoustic guitars (gibson makes great acoustics) but rather that gibson tried to be a lifestyle brand and got into too many ancillary products. if they laser focus on being a guitar brand making great guitars they can go back to owning a valuable niche. technology will continue to change how we make music, and analog instruments will never be the future, but there will always be a place for the best ones.

  • Bass and guitar are my livelihood and passion, so I have a little something to say about this.

    Gibson and Fender used to be the market leaders because it was hard to find anyone else to build anything of equal or greater quality without going to a $10K+ custom shop. Nowadays, all my friends show off

    Bass and guitar are my livelihood and passion, so I have a little something to say about this.

    Gibson and Fender used to be the market leaders because it was hard to find anyone else to build anything of equal or greater quality without going to a $10K+ custom shop. Nowadays, all my friends show off their new guitars from a host of other companies, including Conklin, Kiesel, Paul Reed Smith, etc. Computer/robotic manufacturing processes have also improved to the point that extremely high quality graphite acoustic guitars (like the Rainsong) are now an affordable reality.

    All of us players break out our old Fenders and Gibsons when we need "that sound" for a gig or recording session, or when we are feeling nostalgic at a jam session, but today's Fenders and Gibsons just don't keep up with the competition in either quality or price.

    As for the guitar's waning popularity, there will always be a Renaissance. Until then, I'm happy to shift into the minority and find the niche audiences who still love what we do.

  • “Promoted by the likes of Ed Sheeran and Jack Johnson, the acoustic guitar is increasingly becoming more popular at the expense of the electric guitar.”

  • I agree with Patrick. Gibson needs a passion-driven investor vase to save it. It sadly is this way due to its private equity owner.

    Specialists are better than generalists.

  • The solution here is for a very rich super fan to buy this company and run it like a passion project. Calling Jeff Bezos....

  • Greed! Greed is not Good! Art for profit, is an example of sure economic ruin. Can we imagine the violin master Stradivarius, deciding to mass produce his product? And then out of greed hire foreign workers in factories across oceans to replicate a cheaper costing version? Can we imagine him deciding

    Greed! Greed is not Good! Art for profit, is an example of sure economic ruin. Can we imagine the violin master Stradivarius, deciding to mass produce his product? And then out of greed hire foreign workers in factories across oceans to replicate a cheaper costing version? Can we imagine him deciding to make pianos and organs? No! He made Art!

    A parent is not going to invest $1,300 in a beginner instrument for a child who marched through every fad and shift in the marketplace. That parent wants to ensure, before investing further, the degree of their child’s interest.

    Companies that build Art (or sell top level products) need to understand the economics of their niche. Reaching outside their niche , cannot place risk on their niche. Gibson and Fender once sold Art, now they have a portfolio of products, leveraged on the backbone of Art.

    It won’t survive. Greed.

  • Sometimes when the leadership of a company makes choices to cut corners and engage in less than aboveboard activities, that mentality slowly kills the core.

    My sympathies are with the line employees- these men and women are great examples of skilled American craftsmen producing a great American product.

  • Gibson acquired several guitar Brands that were going out of business. Unfortunately #GibsonGuitars started releasing cheaper replicas under the newly acquired Brands instead of bringing their knowledge and expertise to help improve their business and capitalise on that.

  • Acoustic guitars are increasing in popularity for more than their convenience. Their organic sound is almost a rebellion against popular electronic genres and overblown electric guitar rock.