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Why Cities Are Demolishing Freeways

By The American Conservative

A new vision of the future puts people---not cars---firstRead full story

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  • I think this is a wonderful idea. For most of my life I've seen the freeway system in this country multiply exponentially. They took over so much land that was needed for other things in every city, I’ve seen people go through legal battle just trying to keep the land. That being said it did make things easier for a long time to get from one place to the other barring any construction that was going on. Thing is though you must figure out a balance between improving traffic and preserving the urban

    I think this is a wonderful idea. For most of my life I've seen the freeway system in this country multiply exponentially. They took over so much land that was needed for other things in every city, I’ve seen people go through legal battle just trying to keep the land. That being said it did make things easier for a long time to get from one place to the other barring any construction that was going on. Thing is though you must figure out a balance between improving traffic and preserving the urban areas. This sounds like a step in the right direction.

  • As a resident of Denver who drives the specific stretch of I-70 mentioned in the article nearly six days a week on average. I can say without a doubt that it is essential; approximately 55,000 vehicles travel on I-70 every day. For the majority of the areas in which I-70 passes through, the surrounding roads absolutely cannot handle that kind of traffic. Particularly in the area around Commerce City, there are no other roads that go directly East and West without running into another highway, rail

    As a resident of Denver who drives the specific stretch of I-70 mentioned in the article nearly six days a week on average. I can say without a doubt that it is essential; approximately 55,000 vehicles travel on I-70 every day. For the majority of the areas in which I-70 passes through, the surrounding roads absolutely cannot handle that kind of traffic. Particularly in the area around Commerce City, there are no other roads that go directly East and West without running into another highway, rail yards, reservoirs, or the refineries. While there are some here that oppose the project to redo the interstate, we’ll all be better off once it’s complete.

  • Replacing underused highways is an interesting concept I never really considered. I can certainly see the value in doing it. I’m curious how this might affect overused highways where gridlock is almost 24/7 typical. Also, how might our sharing economy benefit from highway replacement? Do Uber and Lyft rides get better or worse? Uber is initiating a bike sharing service. Local, non-automotive transportation certainly wins the day if we’re replacing old highways with pedestrian only and bike friendly

    Replacing underused highways is an interesting concept I never really considered. I can certainly see the value in doing it. I’m curious how this might affect overused highways where gridlock is almost 24/7 typical. Also, how might our sharing economy benefit from highway replacement? Do Uber and Lyft rides get better or worse? Uber is initiating a bike sharing service. Local, non-automotive transportation certainly wins the day if we’re replacing old highways with pedestrian only and bike friendly streets. On top of that our highways, bridges and overpasses are crumbling. Politically no one, on either side of the aisle seems to have the juice to do anything about it. Perhaps highway replacement is an infrastructure fix that can happen.

  • Fixing the interstate system is a necessity. Strong infrastructure supports the growth of business. The vision of 2040/2050 could be one of less roads, not the vision of 2018.

  • While this piece focuses on America, people and bike friendly policies are particularly important in mega cities in Latam,Asia, and Africa, where traffic has become a major public health hazard.

  • This is an I retesting concept, I get making things more pedestrian friendly but what about semis delivering goods to stores and such? If a Town or city has a store then nine times out of ten semis will need to get to and from those stores to deliver goods people need/want. Also the freeways allow those who travel across the country do so without the hassle of stop and go traffic in cities and towns. I’m not saying it’s a bad idea to get rid of them if it will improve the quality of living for those

    This is an I retesting concept, I get making things more pedestrian friendly but what about semis delivering goods to stores and such? If a Town or city has a store then nine times out of ten semis will need to get to and from those stores to deliver goods people need/want. Also the freeways allow those who travel across the country do so without the hassle of stop and go traffic in cities and towns. I’m not saying it’s a bad idea to get rid of them if it will improve the quality of living for those living in the area, but I hope that the new ideas being presented are taking into consideration those who do need them to do their jobs as well.

  • The amount cities and their tax payers pay for bridge and road repair is astonishing and I think if anything demolishing freeways and instead focusing on pedestrian and public friendly transportation options is more reasonable moving forward.

    I read an article in my local paper about a year ago about the city looking into a project that would revitalize old parking structures that had been abandoned and turning them into low income housing, offices and spaces for local businesses to lease. The

    The amount cities and their tax payers pay for bridge and road repair is astonishing and I think if anything demolishing freeways and instead focusing on pedestrian and public friendly transportation options is more reasonable moving forward.

    I read an article in my local paper about a year ago about the city looking into a project that would revitalize old parking structures that had been abandoned and turning them into low income housing, offices and spaces for local businesses to lease. The idea behind this would be connecting the community and making the need to travel to other cities non-existent.

    Thus demolishing the need for so many freeways. I love it!

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