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Service Meant to Monitor Inmates’ Calls Could Track You, Too

Service Meant to Monitor Inmates’ Calls Could Track You, Too

Read more on The New York Times

Contributions

  • Law enforcement can locate almost any phone in the US - and there are no systems in place to ensure that this is done so legally. Case in point: one police officer used it to spy on a judge.

  • Anyone who thinks for a second that they can’t be tracked by any current electronic is delusional. In this day and age everything and everyone could be tracked by anyone who has the knowhow and the inclination to do so. Today’s technological world we all love the convenience but we hate to think about

    Anyone who thinks for a second that they can’t be tracked by any current electronic is delusional. In this day and age everything and everyone could be tracked by anyone who has the knowhow and the inclination to do so. Today’s technological world we all love the convenience but we hate to think about the realities of always being connected. There does however need to be reliable regulations that keep people from using the access unethically.

  • This is an interesting issue, and as far as I can tell relatively new technology. I worked as a paralegal in recent years, sifting through many hundreds of hours of surveillance audio obtained both through wiretaps and recordings of calls from the local jail. Either the law is better-defined here and

    This is an interesting issue, and as far as I can tell relatively new technology. I worked as a paralegal in recent years, sifting through many hundreds of hours of surveillance audio obtained both through wiretaps and recordings of calls from the local jail. Either the law is better-defined here and a warrant wasn't obtained, or the jail simply didn't have access to this interface.

    Either way, it brings up an interesting dilemma. If, for example, a jail requires a signed affadavit allowing location tracking as a precursor to ANY communication with inmates (much like they do with recordings), that starts to seem coercive. Families may sign over rights that they wouldn't otherwise submit if it's the only way to reach their loved ones. It'll certainly be interesting to follow the case law that accumulates around this issue.