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Losing Weight Is Good for Your Health — But It Could Also Help You Save Money

Losing Weight Is Good for Your Health — But It Could Also Help You Save Money

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  • Treating weight gain and loss in terms of finances is incredibly sound advice. Not only have we know for years that weight gain is associated with income list through discrimination and lowered productivity, but, as the article points out, the reverse is true as well. The article provides good ideas

    Treating weight gain and loss in terms of finances is incredibly sound advice. Not only have we know for years that weight gain is associated with income list through discrimination and lowered productivity, but, as the article points out, the reverse is true as well. The article provides good ideas for reframing how we think about weight and diet. Years ago I lost weight using Weight Watchers. The entire plan is set up like a budget balancing exercise: you get a set amount of points per day and can earn extra with additional work (exercise). You had to stick to your budget and not overspend in order to reach your goals. Most people are familiar and comfortable with this concept from years of balancing their household budgets. The same idea applies here, in both the smaller term daily habits and the longer term, big picture view of weight in general.

  • Well I can tell you that when I am on a healthy diet I have less alcoholic beverages so in my unofficial study I save a ton of money when I’m healthy.

  • A behavioral economics guide to weight loss. Sounds gimmicky, but the piece has some simple but useful wisdom.

  • It kind of makes sense to me, since the less you need the less you'll buy. I just wish it was that way in the rest of life. Normally inflation and things like can also take a toll. I've kind of been testing this Theory. I have been on a diet lately and I have noticed that my food bills have gone way

    It kind of makes sense to me, since the less you need the less you'll buy. I just wish it was that way in the rest of life. Normally inflation and things like can also take a toll. I've kind of been testing this Theory. I have been on a diet lately and I have noticed that my food bills have gone way down. This is awesome because it saves money of course. Hopefully the trend will continue as I lose more weight.I think everyone else should this Theory as well and come back and let everybody know if it truly works.

  • At first I thought this article was going to annoy me. Who doesn’t need a little bit of extra aggravation just before bed on a lazy Friday night? Surprise! It didn’t annoy me at all. Actually, I find the approach novel and interesting. Applying economic principles to weight loss may just be the long

    At first I thought this article was going to annoy me. Who doesn’t need a little bit of extra aggravation just before bed on a lazy Friday night? Surprise! It didn’t annoy me at all. Actually, I find the approach novel and interesting. Applying economic principles to weight loss may just be the long term solution for many who struggle to lose weight. I was especially struck by the idea of comparing weight to debt. Accrued high interest debt is a financial challenge most of us can relate to. It’s also a struggle most of us have learned to overcome. Once you claw your way out of the seemingly insurmountable mountain of 36% interest-credit card debt you retrain your lifestyle and spending choices. You literally change how you live your life. Some folks may find it helpful to convert those extra pounds into high interest credit card purchases. Each time you make an unhealthy food choice you’re adding onto your debt load, accruing late fees, damaging your credit rating and setting yourself up for even higher interest rates. I don’t have a weight problem but I’m quite sure I have sugar addiction. I’m going to give this a shot. I’m going to apply economic principles to my excessive intake of sugar.

  • As a smart, fat, productive person (gasp!) with no health problems, you can all go to hell. Your blatant discrimination hidden behind economics ‘for our own good’ is the reason for the issues.

  • I never considered "monetary loss" as a weight loss incentive. Interesting theory, but it might just work. I certainly need to try something different. Usually I think of healthful eating as being more expensive, especially organic foods or higher quality (less convenient) foods and drinks. But, the

    I never considered "monetary loss" as a weight loss incentive. Interesting theory, but it might just work. I certainly need to try something different. Usually I think of healthful eating as being more expensive, especially organic foods or higher quality (less convenient) foods and drinks. But, the longer term health costs, productivity loss costs, and potential weight discrimination (not only in work situations, but also socially) are all worth reconsidering and reevaluating. Mindset is a big factor after all, too. The following words I'll have to remember: "Body weight and net worth truly are intertwined, and research shows that the more pounds people carry, the less money they tend to have."

  • This is an intelligent way of looking at weight loss and how it affects more than just our bodies. The truth is mostly in the healthcare. Even with insurance, the cost of treating illnesses brought on by obesity can hit hard, and most of that has to do with the frequency of visits as well as prescription

    This is an intelligent way of looking at weight loss and how it affects more than just our bodies. The truth is mostly in the healthcare. Even with insurance, the cost of treating illnesses brought on by obesity can hit hard, and most of that has to do with the frequency of visits as well as prescription costs. If more people looked at losing weight as a financial gain, it’d definitely serve more as incentive. But I do think we, as a people, have the habit of forgetting it’s not just as simple as it seems. Obesity isn’t just caused by upgrading to large value meals. It isn’t caused solely by eating poorly, either. For some, it’s a genuine lack of time, due to the attempt of keeping financial resources flowing in, and that’s something we have to work on further. We have to offer more programs, more incentives, more time. Some people can work out on their lunch breaks, but some of us don’t take lunch breaks. We can say, for a lot of people, there’s already an obsession with financial resources - it’s not as simple for everyone. Putting it in a positive light and offering more incentive would definitely lead to more success when it comes to weight loss. It’s just the matter of making it as a known positive.

  • a simple but profound truth. also the increase of chronic illnesses connected which frequently leeds to 10-20 years of increasing cost and decrease in the enjoyment and decreased ability to engage in life.