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Explaining the Unexplainable: When logic fails, stories and superstitions prevail

Explaining the Unexplainable: When logic fails, stories and superstitions prevail

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  • Fascinating!

    “It turns out that when we are confronted with a situation that presents no obvious pattern our brains amp up the dopamine levels, making us superstitious. The situation creates cognitive confusion and we respond accordingly. Even Voltaire, the arch rational philosopher, might have responded this way.”

  • Before reading this article I would say “superstition” itself is an invention by institutionalized religions. This article offers a more “logical” and “scientific” explanation of being superstitious.

  • Interesting that it’s just humans who are superstitious, pigeons too which isn’t terribly comforting. I assumed it had a lot to do with confidence —confidence st the plate can lead to success but tapping your right row three times can the precursor to that success. Will any of this change the way sports

    Interesting that it’s just humans who are superstitious, pigeons too which isn’t terribly comforting. I assumed it had a lot to do with confidence —confidence st the plate can lead to success but tapping your right row three times can the precursor to that success. Will any of this change the way sports psychologists try to work with their players to prepare them for success? Dopamine gum?

  • Fascinating article. Superstition is apparently an evolutionary adaptation for animals to react to the scarcity and unpredictability of resources. When Mother Nature makes survival a matter of luck, repeating a behavior may increase the odds of making it to the next generation. Superstition may be nature's

    Fascinating article. Superstition is apparently an evolutionary adaptation for animals to react to the scarcity and unpredictability of resources. When Mother Nature makes survival a matter of luck, repeating a behavior may increase the odds of making it to the next generation. Superstition may be nature's take on Pascal's Wager: what do you have to lose?

  • The mind is wonderful - superstition or placebos, they all have impact. Wish I could jump ahead 100 years to then see how much more has been learned about this

  • Interesting piece, fascinating