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Zack Rosebrugh

Good morning.

Electric cars make their mark

2019 was the year electric vehicles grew up. From budget Kias to fleets of e-trucks, this was the biggest year for vehicular electrification yet—but several blockbuster launches belie a hard road ahead as automakers are forced to reinvent themselves.

2019 was the year electric cars grew up

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious for EVs.Tesla has done the yeoman's work of proving you can sell a million or so electric cars to the masses. Its Model 3 accounted for 1 out of every 6 EVs sold worldwide. Now VW, GM, Ford, and others have painted a giant target on Tesla's back. Let the race begin.

Record low unemployment

Americans locked up abroad

Canopy branches out

The future of finance

Solving the climate crisis

The way we colonize Mars says a lot about how we address climate change. Is repeating our mistakes on another planet the answer to our existential crises?

The problems we’re solving for on Earth will only follow us to Mars

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin pumps, solar cells, artificial limbs to name a few). So in my mind, it’s only worth spending all this money on getting to and living on Mars, if in doing so, we develop technology that also helps us solve all our very real problems here on Earth.

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

How Gen Z is changing Tinder

Disrupting dementia

Next-generation dementia care could learn from cancer care. Palliative care helps patients in their final months, and is often used for people suffering from end-stage cancer. But it can actually help anyone who has a long-term, chronic illness, and it could be especially effective for people living with dementia. ✦

Next-generation dementia care could learn a lesson from cancer care

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice, which is a form of palliative care for the last six months of a person's life. Hospice, however, is a form of palliative care, which in general just means person-centered care. Sometimes, this means using life-saving interventions, like antibiotics for an infection. Other times, it means just making sue the person is comfortable. It depends on what the person and their caregivers want.

Palliative care could save dementia care, which is the more expensive in the last five years of life than cancer and heart disease. It could also save health care in general; it's cheaper than the current care systems in place. The trouble is, because it was historically used for cancer treatment, that's how most doctors think of it. Luckily, a few hospitals are testing out palliative care. If their results are good, it could expand nation-wide.

The rising price of immigration

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

The real life Irishman

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5 Big Things I Learned After Leaving Money Magazine

5 Big Things I Learned After Leaving Money Magazine

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Contributions

  • As a former editor of Money Magazine myself, I’ve lived by a few simple rules: 1) Do work that you love; passion fuels success; 2) Spend less than you earn (duh, sounds obvious, but a lot of folks don’t); 3) Worry about squeezing big-ticket expenses first, which have a greater impact on wealth creation

    As a former editor of Money Magazine myself, I’ve lived by a few simple rules: 1) Do work that you love; passion fuels success; 2) Spend less than you earn (duh, sounds obvious, but a lot of folks don’t); 3) Worry about squeezing big-ticket expenses first, which have a greater impact on wealth creation; 4) Dont risk money that you’re not prepared to lose, because ease of mind matters more to quality of life than net worth; 5) Put long-term protection in place (insurance, will, health care proxy, etc); 6) Focus on what you can control, as market conditions, job changes, health troubles can — and will — disrupt every plan; 7) Enjoy the adventure, because smiles are more valuable than account balances.

  • Awesome retrospective on what money can and should mean to us over the long arcs of our lifelong journey. Good luck, Diane!

  • Wise advice that isn’t overwhelming. Good financial habits can be built by anyone no matter their salary or job title.

  • What a great retrospective look on a successful career that provides tangible tools invest in yourself and your future. Reading through the article I was taking mental notes on those big things I am currently doing like investing in my 401k and those that I need to do better at, like budgeting for a

    What a great retrospective look on a successful career that provides tangible tools invest in yourself and your future. Reading through the article I was taking mental notes on those big things I am currently doing like investing in my 401k and those that I need to do better at, like budgeting for a rainy day. I love the term financial wellness as it encompasses more than just saving money or being on a budget. It is wholesome and comprehensive to include a space for fun and individualized planning. Although I am new in my career, looking at someone make a huge career switch after hitting a pinnacle point in her career is truly admirable.

  • A very smart piece from the previous editor of Money magazine, who's a very smart journalist and thinker.

  • All of these are insightful tips. I’m a bit surprised by the statistic about how habit—and not salary—make a bigger impact on whether a family saves or not. Well, I was surprised until I considered my own life haha I recently got a higher paying job and for the first few months, spent money getting all

    All of these are insightful tips. I’m a bit surprised by the statistic about how habit—and not salary—make a bigger impact on whether a family saves or not. Well, I was surprised until I considered my own life haha I recently got a higher paying job and for the first few months, spent money getting all those things I felt denied in the past. After forcing myself into the saving habit, I started to find balance and joy.

    I also agree with how important networking is. When I was a new expat, it was hard to find jobs that fit my skill set but I worked hard to meet and maintain relationships throughout those first few years and managed to land a great new job. The best opportunities are often available through networking.