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Manhattan DA says he'll stop prosecuting pot possession

By FOX

The district attorney of New York City's borough of Manhattan says he will stop prosecuting low-level marijuana casesRead full story

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  • Let's see what the NYPD has to say about this. I'm guessing that people are still going to get cuffed.

  • Maybe it doesn’t solve the whole problem, but it’s a step to addressing and a step toward eradicating the bias. I wish the funding and the manpower for drug-related charges would be redirected toward helping heal life-shattering addictions to heavyweight substances. The marijuana debate feels pithy in comparison to the problem that open drug use has created in urban centers like San Francisco (https://www.buzzfeed.com/jimdalrympleii/public-drug-use-san-francisco?utm_term=.wmb4lMykdO#.dfWjpm1PGw)

    Maybe it doesn’t solve the whole problem, but it’s a step to addressing and a step toward eradicating the bias. I wish the funding and the manpower for drug-related charges would be redirected toward helping heal life-shattering addictions to heavyweight substances. The marijuana debate feels pithy in comparison to the problem that open drug use has created in urban centers like San Francisco (https://www.buzzfeed.com/jimdalrympleii/public-drug-use-san-francisco?utm_term=.wmb4lMykdO#.dfWjpm1PGw). Tackle what hurts most deeply, and we can work our way through the rest of the debate when time and resources allow.

  • In order to really address addiction, the first thing is to stop identifying the problem as inherent in one substance or another. The problem is societal, biological, and influenced by the experience of trauma. To reduce harm we are always better off with public health frame than a criminal one. This is good step forward.

  • Good. Let's get over it already. Good heavens - there's a report that NHTSA gave Congress last year that states drivers under the influence of marijuana keep greater following distances, drive at slower speeds and exercise more caution.

    Good grief! It's safer than alcohol, if it's addictive at all, it's entirely mental as opposed to physical. It has tremendous impact on many chronic diseases and conditions. It's the best thing for PTSD.

    It has all kinds of revenue streams and potential. It doesn't

    Good. Let's get over it already. Good heavens - there's a report that NHTSA gave Congress last year that states drivers under the influence of marijuana keep greater following distances, drive at slower speeds and exercise more caution.

    Good grief! It's safer than alcohol, if it's addictive at all, it's entirely mental as opposed to physical. It has tremendous impact on many chronic diseases and conditions. It's the best thing for PTSD.

    It has all kinds of revenue streams and potential. It doesn't increase crime when it's available and regulated.

    Let's take a chance America. Let's be brave. If it doesn't work out or the majority of voters decide they don't like it, then fine. But let's at least let go of old notions and bad science and take a fresh look at decriminalizing.

  • Coming from a resident of Colorado I can only see this resulting in a leap of pot usage and a multitude of stores and dispensaries being planted. Use at your own risk.

  • Thank you New York for making strides towards reality in the criminal justice system. "Hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers have suffered life-altering harms because of marijuana prohibition and the pretext it provides for law enforcement to over-police communities of color."

    They decriminalized marijuana possession at the end of the 70's but discrimination is still obviously running rampant. I think this is the beginning of peace and I'm happy New York is the innovator. A place where free thinking

    Thank you New York for making strides towards reality in the criminal justice system. "Hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers have suffered life-altering harms because of marijuana prohibition and the pretext it provides for law enforcement to over-police communities of color."

    They decriminalized marijuana possession at the end of the 70's but discrimination is still obviously running rampant. I think this is the beginning of peace and I'm happy New York is the innovator. A place where free thinking is cherished and grown, a place where these small offenders should be walking the streets and living free.

  • This story couldn’t have been published by Fox. This must be fake news!

  • Even though I agree with decriminalizing low-level marijuana possession, I still don't want to see it legalized. Marijuana is still a mind and behavior altering drug that can have the similar consequences to consuming too much alcohol. Also, the smell is a nuisance, so I hope to see that it will be banned in public places just like cigarette smoking. I know that cities see legalization as a big financial windfall, but I still don't understand how it can be federally illegal, while legal at the state

    Even though I agree with decriminalizing low-level marijuana possession, I still don't want to see it legalized. Marijuana is still a mind and behavior altering drug that can have the similar consequences to consuming too much alcohol. Also, the smell is a nuisance, so I hope to see that it will be banned in public places just like cigarette smoking. I know that cities see legalization as a big financial windfall, but I still don't understand how it can be federally illegal, while legal at the state level, in states that allow it. The tide is turning though, so this looks like a first step towards eventual legalization in some form.

  • I like this move. This goes back to the topic of disproportionate punishment. Let’s think: how many black men are serving lengthy prison sentences for having marijuana on them? How many are bullied by the cops? The court? How many more people do we need to see be unfairly punished for such a minor violation to understand that it’s a waste of resources and ultimately useless?

    We need to stop overcrowding our prisons with nonviolent offenders and start penalizing them in more productive ways, preferably

    I like this move. This goes back to the topic of disproportionate punishment. Let’s think: how many black men are serving lengthy prison sentences for having marijuana on them? How many are bullied by the cops? The court? How many more people do we need to see be unfairly punished for such a minor violation to understand that it’s a waste of resources and ultimately useless?

    We need to stop overcrowding our prisons with nonviolent offenders and start penalizing them in more productive ways, preferably ways that don’t seek out further punishment (like how parole does). If we stop prosecuting minor offenses like this and start treating them like what they are, we will be so much better off for it.

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