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This Is How a Brick-and-Mortar Store Can Thrive in the Age of Amazon

By The Cut

Online shopping isn’t going anywhere, so stores that would rather not shut down are adapting, resulting in a somewhat surprising retail renaissanceRead full story

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  • Unless physical stores really innovate and introduce an advantage for themselves, they will be squeezed out of business, you can’t have your business operating the same way it has been 30 years ago and expect to be profitable.

    I am more worried on the real estate market as number of leases go down, more worried about supply compaines, maintenance workers and more who thrive on a phyiscal store economy, what would be the impact for them?

  • What this article clearly suggests is the conventional retail - no service, lots of stuff and no curation is over. its about the differentiation - I choose to go to a store now vs I have to go to a store to buy something - That is a fundamental shift and while some retail survives there will be many more losses on the way!

  • So many thoughts here.

    First off, there was a big NYT story last year about the fall of Bleecker Street which is an important read: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/31/fashion/bleecker-street-shopping-empty-storefronts.html

    Second, Brookfield has been under pressure compared to GGP and Westfield in staying innovative as a mall operator due to the retail world crumbling under overhead and trends. I knew they were launching an innovation space but wasn't sure where. This opportunity on Bleecker

    So many thoughts here.

    First off, there was a big NYT story last year about the fall of Bleecker Street which is an important read: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/31/fashion/bleecker-street-shopping-empty-storefronts.html

    Second, Brookfield has been under pressure compared to GGP and Westfield in staying innovative as a mall operator due to the retail world crumbling under overhead and trends. I knew they were launching an innovation space but wasn't sure where. This opportunity on Bleecker, which regardless of the vacant spots, is still an institution of a shopping street in NYC, is a smart move.

    Third, it's exciting that Margaux, started by two awesome women and has its showroom in Chelsea, will get its first popup in this space. Ladies, if you haven't tried their flats, definitely do this summer.

    Fourth, I'm curious to see what other brands will get the space. Will it be single-function ones like Margaux for shoes, multi-layer ones like ADAY (womenswear) or Baron Fig (stationary), or marketplaces like Bulletin?

    Fifth, the high-low effect works well when balancing the customer traffic of locals looking for specific items and tourists wanting to wander and take it all in. (And the opposites of course.)

    Finally, I'm glad to see the Mayor's Office going up against landlords who are being unreasonable and leaving stores vacant in the process. The only way these streets and spaces can continue to thrive is for these landlords to be more flexible and less curmudgeonly.

  • “I come in the store to find something I didn’t know I was looking for,” Nordstrom philosophizes. “That’s what a great store does. The treasure hunt. A new fit, a new brand.”

    It’s a trap. 💸 Stay home. 😴

  • Great article with retail case study that breaks down the source of profits.

  • we seem to be moveing a bit to fast..emotionally we need to as they say : stop ..& smell the flowers..

  • This feels like a very New York story to me. These rules don't apply in a city or are without a thriving pedestrian culture.

  • Store as Disneyland

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