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Hong Kong's future

China is creating a plan to replace Carrie Lam. If Xi Jinping gives the go-ahead, Lam’s replacement would be installed by March and serve out the rest of her term until 2022, CNBC reports. Timing is key as Beijing reportedly wants to wait until protests calm down.

Beijing reportedly developing plan to replace Hong Kong's leader by March

The PLA has a garrison of 6000 troops and armored vehicles in Hong Kong, on the island and in the New Territories. So, can we rachet back on the "troops on the border" rhetoric? They are already here. Carrie Lam had the opportunity to make some concessions to the protesters; an inquiry into violence

The PLA has a garrison of 6000 troops and armored vehicles in Hong Kong, on the island and in the New Territories. So, can we rachet back on the "troops on the border" rhetoric? They are already here. Carrie Lam had the opportunity to make some concessions to the protesters; an inquiry into violence and brutality and to reintroduce the 2014 suffrage legislation, flawed that it is. But having witnessed the chaos and destruction of the protesters first hand, I'm less inclined to believe they are truly protesting for democracy.

Lebanon, in 📉 and 📸

India's coal addiction

What makes coal so dirty? It’s a crucial question, given that without cutting its use drastically, the world won’t hit its greenhouse gas emissions targets. Quartz reporter Akshat explains the trouble with the sedimentary rock, which India uses for 55% of its energy. ✦

The science of what makes coal so dirty

Coal's many sins shouldn't be used to forget the value it has offered to humanity. Coal powered the industrial revolution and it continues to pull people out of poverty in much of the world. During the 17th and 18th centuries, coal helped create the carbon-based branch of chemistry we call "organic chemistry,

Coal's many sins shouldn't be used to forget the value it has offered to humanity. Coal powered the industrial revolution and it continues to pull people out of poverty in much of the world. During the 17th and 18th centuries, coal helped create the carbon-based branch of chemistry we call "organic chemistry," which I studied to gain my PhD from the University of Oxford. Organic chemists have won one in five of all Nobel Prizes in chemistry awarded over the last 120 years.

Coal is typically just carbon when taught in chemistry class. I had no idea that in reality, it contains so many other elements (mercury, cadmium, etc). The coal scientist Akshat quotes sums it up nicely: “coal is the most complex solid we’ve ever found and analyzed”.

China's tech darlings

India's online marketplace

Different kinds of jobs

Under Armour's founder will step down as CEO. Kevin Plank is handing the reigns of his sportswear empire to chief operating officer Patrik Frisk—who will still report to Plank in his new role as executive chairman. Plank will work on reenergizing its products and image.

Kevin Plank is stepping down as Under Armour CEO to work on reenergizing its products and image

Frisk helped build two of the strongest brands at VF Corp (The North Face and Timberland) up into the mainstream and did the same as CEO of Aldo. It's the right transition for the brand, but I'm not entirely convinced of its move away from athleisure.

UA's brand is performance, but having an "everyday

Frisk helped build two of the strongest brands at VF Corp (The North Face and Timberland) up into the mainstream and did the same as CEO of Aldo. It's the right transition for the brand, but I'm not entirely convinced of its move away from athleisure.

UA's brand is performance, but having an "everyday" or "off day" division of clothing may help balance the rise of athleisure brands like Lululemon slowly adding on performance divisions.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

If overall sales are booming for Nike while US sales are slowing down, that means that their footprint internationally is growing a lot (like Netflix and a few other US companies with a strong global brand identity). If they’re looking to the future, a former e-bay leader makes sense as someone to help

If overall sales are booming for Nike while US sales are slowing down, that means that their footprint internationally is growing a lot (like Netflix and a few other US companies with a strong global brand identity). If they’re looking to the future, a former e-bay leader makes sense as someone to help build online based infrastructure for the global market instead of having to build a deep network of vendors to sell their products like they have established at home.

This is a very interesting move. It just goes to show that the biggest companies on the planet are all actually tech companies today - whether you realize it or not...

Money, money, money

Lawmakers move to make it much harder to launder money in the US. A bill looking to dent America’s status as the world’s biggest tax haven—by forcing owners of US firms to disclose identities to law enforcement—passed a vote in the House.

Lawmakers move to make it much harder to launder money in the US

This would be a welcome, if painfully overdue, measure to curb the use of shell companies, etc. It’s just way too easy to hide assets on an incredible scale in the US, mainly because of the government’s refusal to do anything about it.

Of course, whatever actually gets implemented will probably be a

This would be a welcome, if painfully overdue, measure to curb the use of shell companies, etc. It’s just way too easy to hide assets on an incredible scale in the US, mainly because of the government’s refusal to do anything about it.

Of course, whatever actually gets implemented will probably be a halfhearted, loophole-ridden mess... but at least it would be something.

Now if only they’d crack down on corporate tax evasion. You’d think the government would have a strong incentive to make corporations and the rich pay what they owe, but that’s not the case when lobbyists run the country.

This is pretty big from the White House: "The bill got a late boost today when the White House commended it, saying it 'represents important progress in strengthening national security, supporting law enforcement, and clarifying regulatory requirements.'"

And if you haven't yet, definitely read colleague

This is pretty big from the White House: "The bill got a late boost today when the White House commended it, saying it 'represents important progress in strengthening national security, supporting law enforcement, and clarifying regulatory requirements.'"

And if you haven't yet, definitely read colleague Max de Haldevang's deep dive (Quartz member exclusive) into the United States as the world's largest tax haven: https://qz.com/1593317/welcome-to-the-worlds-biggest-tax-haven-the-usa/

It is a start but clever lawyers and international banking will avoid the traps. If they were really serious crypto payments and other anonymous payment systems would also have to be shut down.

The complexity of money laundering techniques make it challenging to uncover wrongdoing when information can be hidden about the nature and ownership structure of companies. It is good to see that the USA is joining others across the world to finally bridge this gap. One risk to guard against is the

The complexity of money laundering techniques make it challenging to uncover wrongdoing when information can be hidden about the nature and ownership structure of companies. It is good to see that the USA is joining others across the world to finally bridge this gap. One risk to guard against is the politically motivated investigations such added transparency could drive in the short run.

International Astronautical Congress

To infinity and beyond. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has put together a new consortium to build a lunar lander for NASA’s Artemis program with his space company Blue Origin.

Jeff Bezos has built a team to take astronauts back to the moon

Blue Origin vs SpaceX seems like a very interesting “old school vs new school” battle - just in space. I think the real crux of this race is whether NASA will be the center body in the 21st century space race, like it was in the 20th century. If yes - it sounds like Bezos has this in the bag due to the

Blue Origin vs SpaceX seems like a very interesting “old school vs new school” battle - just in space. I think the real crux of this race is whether NASA will be the center body in the 21st century space race, like it was in the 20th century. If yes - it sounds like Bezos has this in the bag due to the ties he’s built to the space-faring establishment. If no - I’d say Musk has it because he has stronger brand identity with the public and he’s also doing regular business with other countries as well as private businesses for launching satellites and other equipment.

If the dorm-room style space entrepreneurship plays out like Bezos mentions in this article - will those kids think to call Blue Origin or SpaceX first?

Marking 30 years of the web

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Attending Harvard will cost $475,000 in 2036. Here's how much other schools will charge

Attending Harvard will cost $475,000 in 2036. Here's how much other schools will charge

Read more on CNBC

From Our Members

  • Ludacris! Does that mean that the same jobs today targeted to the same students/degrees will also double?! Likely not. I guess my kids will just have to run convenience stores and nail salons.

  • There is zero correlation between price and quality in education. I would love to see the figures for less esteemed schools. I bet they’re just as high. That means that the cost of going to a school that cannot provide the kind of experience and opportunities at Harvard will cost just as much.

  • What is value of college? and how to change in the future?

    Technology will let us access to high quality educations easily.

    Also, recruiting process or evaluation system will change - or have already changed? - from graduated collage to actions and results of person. I don't want to pay for half million dollars for college...

  • I hope the “dreams” of parents evolve, along with our capability to learn from the best, wherever that professor may be. No longer will top flight learning need to occur at one place. How wonderful colleges are forcing themselves to educate students in innovative ways we can only imagine. They are spiraling

    I hope the “dreams” of parents evolve, along with our capability to learn from the best, wherever that professor may be. No longer will top flight learning need to occur at one place. How wonderful colleges are forcing themselves to educate students in innovative ways we can only imagine. They are spiraling themselves out of possibility, if the trend holds.

  • 4-year college at age 18 is an anachronism of another era, when expertise at age 22 persisted a full career (and life expectancy was mid-40s). We need to rethink higher-education models from a century ago. We all know it — except when it comes to our OWN kids. Then we’re risk- and change-averse. (I’m guilty here too!)

  • Yes but they have the best scholarships / record. PERIOD. Proud alum

  • Many if not most if those less-esteemed schools will fold by 2036 as rising costs push more students into state colleges and universities, which will be close to free. And no, don’t blame the Socialists. But because of Bernie and others, college will be seen for what it is: critical infrastructure for

    Many if not most if those less-esteemed schools will fold by 2036 as rising costs push more students into state colleges and universities, which will be close to free. And no, don’t blame the Socialists. But because of Bernie and others, college will be seen for what it is: critical infrastructure for supporting a growing, vibrant, creative economy, the use of which is seen as a right, not a privilege.

  • I do think that college will (eventually) be obsolete. It’ll be interesting to see how school, especially top schools would deal with this education trend

  • This NPR story is worth a listen where they distinguish between sticker v net price of tuition. “There are two prices for every college degree: the sticker price and the net price. The sticker price is the number that most schools list in their brochures. The net price is that very same number less scholarships

    This NPR story is worth a listen where they distinguish between sticker v net price of tuition. “There are two prices for every college degree: the sticker price and the net price. The sticker price is the number that most schools list in their brochures. The net price is that very same number less scholarships, grants and financial aid.” https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/09/30/444446022/what-youll-actually-pay-at-1-550-colleges

  • Outside of the top 1% (Let’s be honest, there will always be demand for Harvard, irregardless of price) the article ignores the fact that higher ed will soon face a demand crisis.

    Let’s ignore, momentarily, the fact that more high school students are choosing to forgo college for alternative education

    Outside of the top 1% (Let’s be honest, there will always be demand for Harvard, irregardless of price) the article ignores the fact that higher ed will soon face a demand crisis.

    Let’s ignore, momentarily, the fact that more high school students are choosing to forgo college for alternative education paths and focus on this: high school graduates in the US will remain flat and are slated to drop between 2026 and 2031! Add technology and new “disrupters” in education coupled with explosive tuition increases in traditional higher-ed and you’re facing a supply and demand issue.

    Outside of the “price inelastic” institutions, higher ed is about to face some harsh realities in the future.

  • If you want to look at the cost of college in terms of anything, I would state it in terms of its ability to grant students access to novel opportunities. You can learn most of what any school teaches online. But research is unique to each university, and so are established career pipelines. Those two

    If you want to look at the cost of college in terms of anything, I would state it in terms of its ability to grant students access to novel opportunities. You can learn most of what any school teaches online. But research is unique to each university, and so are established career pipelines. Those two kinds of opportunities may justify the price. But there’s a kind of “goodwill” baked into the price as well — the value of the brand name, which, strictly speaking, is dubious. I think you should try to pay only minimally for goodwill. But hey, I’m not here to do a DCF on the value of college, although it’d be a good case study.

  • I think everybody necessarily doesn't go to the college since there are a bunch of online lecture that provide a great quality of the education and cost less expensive.

    Besides the current education is behind(especially for IT industry)

    I could consider costing a lot as the positive forecast.

    1.Only

    I think everybody necessarily doesn't go to the college since there are a bunch of online lecture that provide a great quality of the education and cost less expensive.

    Besides the current education is behind(especially for IT industry)

    I could consider costing a lot as the positive forecast.

    1.Only the rich or the genius will be able to register. That means the bright students could invent and make a new venture company funded by the rick friends.

    2.Less people will go to the college.That means the college degree is less important. It will lead the world to be more fair in terms of job employment.

    It will be very tough for most conventional people but it also will be flexible.

    People need study spontaneously what they really want to do.

  • Quite the contrast to my alma mater which the NYT profiled as the best college in the country/world earlier this week https://newspicks.us/news/811490/

  • The best way to make a society dysfunctional and to ensure it withers on the vine is to make education expensive and elitist. Did you know that Germany lets Americans attend University in English for free?

  • No one is going to Harvard

  • Hello There 😉.. ? 👌 Mar7babsham

  • I went to New Paltz State University in NY State. We had 19 required courses including UsA, African, Asian, Middle East culture and history. Geography, European history , Math, physics or chem and public speaking. My friend who went to Iowa State envies my education. I feel That I was blessed. The school

    I went to New Paltz State University in NY State. We had 19 required courses including UsA, African, Asian, Middle East culture and history. Geography, European history , Math, physics or chem and public speaking. My friend who went to Iowa State envies my education. I feel That I was blessed. The school no longer has those requirements and it is a shame. It prepared me to deal with the world and my fellow humans in a civilized way