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Anasticia Sholik

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SCOTUS update

The world's eyes are on a US child abduction case. The supreme court will decide how to apply international law in the case of a mother taking her daughter from Italy to the US to flee her allegedly abusive ex-husband.

A case about international child abduction law has the world watching SCOTUS

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea that your once true love will take off with your child to another land.

This week the US Supreme Court will consider just such a horror story, the tale of a small child separated from her mother and at the center of an international custody dispute of global significance.

Trump and the courts

Objectivity is on trial in Trump's impeachment hearings. A republican congressman sought to undermine a panel of four legal experts by asking whether they voted for Donald Trump—attacking a core principle of the judiciary system that people can put biases aside and act impartially.

The concept of objectivity is under attack at the Trump impeachment hearings

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars testifying, questioning their objectivity and suggesting that they could not possibly be unbiased if they didn't reveal how they voted in the last presidential elections. And with each observer they manage to convince of this impossibility, we all lose a little bit more.

Trump's taxes will stay secret, for now. Trump argues that, as the president, his financial records are special. Lower courts have disagreed—but the US Supreme Court has granted the president's legal team more time to work on their petition.

The Supreme Court grants Trump’s emergency stay in financial records case

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't signaling her approval of Trump's legal stance, just giving him time to file a petition for review, and it happened to be her because the justices rotate duties with respect to emergency applications. Now the House of Representatives must respond by Dec. 11 and the justices will ultimately have to decide if they want to walk into this political landmine and accept review of three financial matters dealing with Trump's records and his claims the executive is special.

Metals.com scam

Amazon attrition

At the movies

Fashion forward

Reshaping society

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

See you later!

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Starbucks and the Issue of White Space

Starbucks and the Issue of White Space

Read more on The New Yorker

Contributions

  • Implicit bias is a societal issue, and kudos to Starbucks for addressing it. Wouldn’t it be great if other institutions took similar steps before a PR crisis forces them to?

  • Just the fact that we are talking about this every day is a big deal. I grew up after the Civil Rights Movement of the 50's and 60's, but before this new discussion. People in the 80's and 90's who routinely talked about racism or sexism were seen by the masses as outdated hippies holding onto the fringes

    Just the fact that we are talking about this every day is a big deal. I grew up after the Civil Rights Movement of the 50's and 60's, but before this new discussion. People in the 80's and 90's who routinely talked about racism or sexism were seen by the masses as outdated hippies holding onto the fringes of a settled issue.

    Somewhere, something changed, and it is now acceptable to continue the discussion about the elephant in the room. Thank goodness!

  • Although Starbucks has taken reactive approaches for its employees to support community engagement, I am unsure how opening Starbucks restrooms to non-paying patrons will facilitate value for their stakeholders.

  • “What’s most crucial isn’t whether a company can diminish bias among its employees. It’s the acknowledgment that bias is so pervasive it has to try.” Worth a shot. And thank you for trying. If not now, when?

  • “The concept of “implicit bias”—the subtle, unconscious responses that we’re conditioned to display—has lately become familiar, for reasons relating both to its valence among academics and to its ability to bridge a particular chasm in the dialogue about race. The popular perception of racism as mostly

    “The concept of “implicit bias”—the subtle, unconscious responses that we’re conditioned to display—has lately become familiar, for reasons relating both to its valence among academics and to its ability to bridge a particular chasm in the dialogue about race. The popular perception of racism as mostly the product of the kind of monstrous people who, say, would drive into a crowd of pedestrians in Charlottesville, Virginia, makes it difficult to address the more pervasive daily practices of it.”

    “...The crucial aspect of the Starbucks story isn’t whether a company can, in a single training session, diminish bias among its employees. It’s the implied acknowledgment that such attitudes are so pervasive in America that a company has to shoulder the responsibility of mitigating them in its workforce. It would be possible to see the recent incidents as a survivable pestering—racism as nuisance—were it not for the fact that the denial of the unimpeded use of public space has been central to the battles over civil rights since Emancipation...”

    “...In a famous dissent, Justice John Marshall Harlan noted that “today it is the colored race which is denied, by corporations and individuals wielding public authority, rights fundamental in their freedom and citizenship.” He added, “At some future time, it may be that some other race will fall under the ban of race discrimination.” Not only was Justice Harlan prescient about the current treatment of other races; he also foresaw a Presidency that strives to make the United States itself feel like a white space. Implicit biases often have a way of becoming explicit ones.”

  • the world has changed dramatically since John Newtown, Wilberforce, and Olaudah Equiano 200 years ago outlawed slavery. much of the world still resides within those parameters. I applaud any good effort to continue this world wide struggle. as a deep south white, world traveler, and person of faith I

    the world has changed dramatically since John Newtown, Wilberforce, and Olaudah Equiano 200 years ago outlawed slavery. much of the world still resides within those parameters. I applaud any good effort to continue this world wide struggle. as a deep south white, world traveler, and person of faith I am haunted daily by memories of black friends struggles, 3rd world exploitation and racism by people of many races and backgrounds, and family and friends who were caught up in bad choices. I am very thankful for parents who fell in the pattern of Atticus Finch sparing me this albatross, yet not the ghost. I long for the day when people will be judged by their character and not their social appearance. my hope and faith point me to this day and I am thankful.