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Arlington Cemetery, Nearly Full, May Become More Exclusive

By The New York Times

NYT Page 1 - ARLINGTON, Va. — The solemn ritual of a burial with military honors is repeated dozens of times a day, in foul weather or fair, at Arlington National Cemetery, honoring service members from privates to presidents. But in order to preserve the tradition of burial at the nation’s foremost military cemetery for future generations, the Army, which runs Arlington, says it may have to deny it to nearly all veterans who are living today

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  • James Randorff
    James RandorffMusician, Instructor at US Navy

    This has nothing to do with sending too many people off to war. The reason Arlington is filling up is because we have been burying anyone there who had honorable military service and wanted to be buried there, not just those killed in combat or those who served a full military career to retirement.

  • Max Lockie
    Max LockiePlatform Editor at Quartz

    When the military cemetery is running out of room it might be a sign to wage less war.

  • Christopher Buford
    Christopher BufordRockland Community College

    Honestly not getting political but I know Andros, Greece at least on that island they bury people and return about 7 years till we more or less become dust. Ashes to ashes dust to dust, then have the ashes in a container in a mausoleum which allows more heroes to be buried and still recognized for going above and beyond the call of duty.

  • john carver
    john carver

    it is the duty of any nation to honor their military dead. it's not a political grandstand or an authoritarian monument of mind slavery. since there has been man, there has been war, and it is almost unilaterally recognized that it is the sacred duty of the living to properly memorialize those who sacrificed all.

    I'm sure that the burials will be become more of exclusive to combat wounded and medal recipients only while more land is procured for the continuance of our military tradition, but it

    it is the duty of any nation to honor their military dead. it's not a political grandstand or an authoritarian monument of mind slavery. since there has been man, there has been war, and it is almost unilaterally recognized that it is the sacred duty of the living to properly memorialize those who sacrificed all.

    I'm sure that the burials will be become more of exclusive to combat wounded and medal recipients only while more land is procured for the continuance of our military tradition, but it wouldn't be the first time that traditions had been changed permanently, if exclusivity becomes and remains the bottom line.

  • Alexis Hickman
    Alexis HickmanCEO at LLEP World Consultants, LLC

    Space is valued and populated

  • Nafis Wilson
    Nafis Wilson

    Stop sending off so many troops to die!

  • David Landau
    David LandauManaging Partner

    “Among the limestone rows are milestones of human progress: The first explorer to map the Grand Canyon, the first person killed in an airplane crash, the first astronauts to die trying to reach space. Some distinguished themselves on the battlefield, others in later life, including Albert Sabin, who served briefly as a wartime Army doctor and went on to develop a polio vaccine, and Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., a wounded Civil War lieutenant of little distinction who later became a Supreme Court justice

    “Among the limestone rows are milestones of human progress: The first explorer to map the Grand Canyon, the first person killed in an airplane crash, the first astronauts to die trying to reach space. Some distinguished themselves on the battlefield, others in later life, including Albert Sabin, who served briefly as a wartime Army doctor and went on to develop a polio vaccine, and Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., a wounded Civil War lieutenant of little distinction who later became a Supreme Court justice. Most would have been barred under restrictions now being contemplated by the Army.

    The modern concept of Arlington — an egalitarian Elysian field where generals and GIs of every creed and color are buried side by side — did not truly emerge until the cemetery was desegregated after World War II.”

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