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Whither VR/AR?

By TechCrunch

“Despite many pronouncements that 2016 was the year of VR, a more apt word for virtual reality might be absence,” The Economist observed caustically last summer, noting that during that year forecaRead full story

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  • Couldn’t agree more - AR/VR have fallen way short of the tech and VC industry’s expectations, and I’m not surprised. They still don’t present a compelling enough solution to any of our real world problems, and until they do, they’re likely to remain in the niche category.

  • As the article points out it's still a matter of when, not if. On a personal level this was the year that VR went from a curiosity to a technology I am truly excited about. I brought friends and family to the local VR pop-up to experience Google Tiltbrush, Raw Data, and more. But that's just the challenge

    As the article points out it's still a matter of when, not if. On a personal level this was the year that VR went from a curiosity to a technology I am truly excited about. I brought friends and family to the local VR pop-up to experience Google Tiltbrush, Raw Data, and more. But that's just the challenge: we had to go to a pop-up store. The content is compelling enough, but the hardware is still too finicky (and the PS4 solution isn't quite enough). When high-quality VR is an easy add-on to our mobile devices or TVs, it'll be everywhere. So, whither VR? It's a content distribution problem. But I for one am comfortable predicting by the time I reach the old-age home I'll be able to don a visor and be Spiderman.

  • VR/AR has been studied and practiced for decades since 50s. The cycle of hardware leap brought hypes once in each decade. This time, it was due to resolution and performance of smartphone devices, it made it seem available for everyone's hands.

    VR for fully digital immersive experience and AR for overlaying

    VR/AR has been studied and practiced for decades since 50s. The cycle of hardware leap brought hypes once in each decade. This time, it was due to resolution and performance of smartphone devices, it made it seem available for everyone's hands.

    VR for fully digital immersive experience and AR for overlaying digital entities into real world; if we abstract the concept, they are part of our lives already. Pokemon Go is interesting not so much on monsters on camera view but the play rule depended on real locations (many precedent in the past). Sending pictures with 3D objects seamlessly placed, and with location data is sort of a version of AR that makes sense with hardwares readily available to us Today. Maybe not in the form of fully goggle or users holding smartphones chasing after virtual objects.. yet.

  • Says little about VR/AR and a lot about how most people have unrealistic timelines for the development and adoption of new technology. The real take away is that there is still an opportunity to invest in VR/AR.

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