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Here’s How Higher Education Dies

By The Atlantic

A futurist says the industry may have nowhere to go but down. What does the slide look likeRead full story

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  • My husband gleaned that innovation is completely stagnant at the university level. So he left academia to teach upper school at a secondary school, and has been developing transformative curriculum ever since.

  • There’s no news here: Higher ed is being disrupted just like every other industry. The only difference is that - in this case - the stalwart brands actually have the greatest advantage in contrast to the typical way in which an industry is disrupted with the dinosaur first (think Kodak).

    Also: Let’s stop titling people as “futurists,” just as naming someone an “oxygen breather” is useless.

  • Here in Brazil is happening pretty much the same. Not sure if it is for the same reasons. The university's and colleges are getting less students each year, people here believe that higher education now is not so importante as it was. And this is because graduated person aren't getting any jobs. They are unemployed, or have low salary. The situation is bad for graduated starters.

  • Online learning and the death of higher education, as alluded in the article, are connected. There's just so much free information online that you could learn basically anything. It's also easier to do it in smaller chunks while executing on the knowledge such that you remember the information longer. Plus you get to learn only the information you need. Where higher education still has an upper hand, however, is in issuing certificates. This too, however, can be done by a bunch of other organizations

    Online learning and the death of higher education, as alluded in the article, are connected. There's just so much free information online that you could learn basically anything. It's also easier to do it in smaller chunks while executing on the knowledge such that you remember the information longer. Plus you get to learn only the information you need. Where higher education still has an upper hand, however, is in issuing certificates. This too, however, can be done by a bunch of other organizations. Much like the SATs. Or even colleges themselves can create certifying mechanisms for non 4 year students. I think we will see most liberal arts courses die off but scientific courses like Physics, Medicine etc are likely to ride the storm out longer. The advantages of doing those in an institution are still exceedingly high.

  • Education was a mission of the Republic. If its concentration in the brick and mortar system totally disappears the future of fundamental institutions such as countries might also be short.

  • I can definitely see all of these things happening, especially since there is a more creative and self taught generation that believes that it will be able to get by without a higher education. and are higher education platforms really preparing us for a future job. why not just job into that job as an apprentice and learn from the bottom up. why spends hundreds of thousands of dollars and all you have to show for it is a piece of paper as you scour the job market for somewhere to use it. colleges

    I can definitely see all of these things happening, especially since there is a more creative and self taught generation that believes that it will be able to get by without a higher education. and are higher education platforms really preparing us for a future job. why not just job into that job as an apprentice and learn from the bottom up. why spends hundreds of thousands of dollars and all you have to show for it is a piece of paper as you scour the job market for somewhere to use it. colleges are going to have to start offering more of they want people to keep enrolling

  • “Higher ed is often described as a bubble—and much like the housing market in 2008, the thought goes, it will ultimately burst. But what if it’s less of a sudden pop and more of a long, slow slide, and we are already on the way down?”

  • It’s a challenging time to be in a struggling environment as described here. There is at once desperation for change and innovation and a reluctance to take risks or stick one’s neck out for fear of losing a job in a shrinking sector.

  • never have so many paid so much for so few. practical application pays divideds for life learning a trade, working in the medical field, starting a business, or if fortunate STEM careers will achieve this. hard work and honest labor should never be looked down on or taken for granted no matter the level of education. seems like we still have a lot to learn.

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