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Alessandro Cripsta

Good morning.

Up, up, and away

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

Quartz at work

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

The world in 50 years

What will we eat? “A lot more plants,” says scientist and author Bill Nye. Check out the predictions from artist and activist Mai Khôi, Andreessen Horowitz general partner Vijay Pande, transhumanist Zoltan Istvan, and more thought leaders.

The World in 50 Years: What will we eat?

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout. Radical transformation. Super radical!

Apple's Indian revival

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Locked up in America

Surprising discovery

Come back soon!

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All Politics Is National Because All Media Is National

All Politics Is National Because All Media Is National

Read more on FiveThirtyEight

From Our Members

  • Can't talk about this trend without saying more about the economics. Yes, there's been a shift in our country away from geography as the main reason readers pick their news and more toward issues—often same issues that now divide the country, sadly.

    But as importantly: Local reporting has been gutted

    Can't talk about this trend without saying more about the economics. Yes, there's been a shift in our country away from geography as the main reason readers pick their news and more toward issues—often same issues that now divide the country, sadly.

    But as importantly: Local reporting has been gutted in many places simply because it's far cheaper for publications to pay for an AP feed of national and international news than it is to have reporters and writers go out and find/write stories. (Local news on TV, meanwhile, is essentially the most salacious things on the crime blotter.) Chains like Patch that have tried to do local news at scale have failed. Reality is no one has really figured out local-digital ad sales.

    So local news is a huge conundrum: Everybody claims to be interested in it—and I believe them; it's human nature to be curious about what's happening down the block or in the center of town—and yet no one (or very few) can seem to make it work as a business.

  • The volume of the national political discussion has drowned out important state and local reporting.

  • As someone who worked for a hyperlocal news organization, I take issue with this story for multiple reasons. First, people do care quite a bit about local news. Internal data from the original version of AOL's Patch routinely showed us that people in our towns (more than 1000 truly hyperlocal sites

    As someone who worked for a hyperlocal news organization, I take issue with this story for multiple reasons. First, people do care quite a bit about local news. Internal data from the original version of AOL's Patch routinely showed us that people in our towns (more than 1000 truly hyperlocal sites, not the regional stuff of the current Patch iteration) cared about three things, schools, fire and safety and local taxes. Whenever we ran the numbers, those three topics always supplanted each other in the top three depending on the month or time of year. What caused problems was when the C-suite demanded Patch editors create generic content, national content to appeal to national advertisers. This frustrated both editors and readers because they didn't come to their local Patch site for national news and ads, they came for local news and ads. The problem was that local mom and pop stores have very tight margins and a monthly ad promotion really hit the bottom line. There was not enough local advertising to support Patch, but national advertisers insisted on bland, uniform content for their ads. So, yes, TV news and the Internet has made national news more accessible, but it doesn't mean people don't want the best in news about the communities they live, it's just not true.

  • This is a frightening trend. I know a shockingly little amount about the state of local government or the issues on the table in New York (except the subways) mainly because none of my news sources are local.

    "In recent years, though, our reliance on spatially bound media sources has eroded. Cable

    This is a frightening trend. I know a shockingly little amount about the state of local government or the issues on the table in New York (except the subways) mainly because none of my news sources are local.

    "In recent years, though, our reliance on spatially bound media sources has eroded. Cable television and the internet have introduced a host of new competitors that attract audiences based on a shared interest in politics rather than a shared geography."

    Exactly right. This is not just a generation gap either. My father still gets the Valley News delivered every day (local paper for VT and NH), but he's not really reading it--instead he prefers the New York Times.

    Ignorance of local politics has dire consequences. I, for one, will start paying more attention.