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Zack Rosebrugh

Good morning.

Net positive

Last-minute Brexit deal

There’s no uniform “European way of life” either. The remarks of the incoming European Commission president might be wishful thinking. Survey data shows a range of views across the continent—covering everything from welfare, immigrants, LGBT rights, and even democracy.

Even Europeans don’t agree on what the “European way of life” is

Collecting data for this piece led to some real surprises for me, including when I learned that 45% of Lithuanians disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement "Gay men and lesbians should be free to live their own life as they wish." That seems to contradict the belief of the incoming EU Commission

Collecting data for this piece led to some real surprises for me, including when I learned that 45% of Lithuanians disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement "Gay men and lesbians should be free to live their own life as they wish." That seems to contradict the belief of the incoming EU Commission that there is a "shared European way of life" to protect. If so, what is it?

What comes after the iPhone?

Can Apple do it again? The iPhone turned Apple from a successful computer company into the world’s most profitable consumer electronics operation. But as this Quartz member exclusive shows, its success could also spell Apple’s undoing.

Can Apple do it again?

Apple is at crossroads. It revolutionized the way we communicate with the iPhone nearly 13 years ago, but its longtime cash cow has started to waver. Apple has a host of new bets in the works, some that could also change the world as the iPhone did. But will any of them actually be able to do it?

Apple is currently a perfect example of a business case where a company which itself creates a high bar that it become de facto standard and is now at crossroads as it hasn't been able to repeat its same success.

Consumers are looking for beyond mobile phone for sure. Hence very interesting to watch

Apple is currently a perfect example of a business case where a company which itself creates a high bar that it become de facto standard and is now at crossroads as it hasn't been able to repeat its same success.

Consumers are looking for beyond mobile phone for sure. Hence very interesting to watch as to how they would turn it around by either building a full ecosystem of products/services or new revolutionary ideas.

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This is the most sensible strategy in the near term while they work on the next big thing which may not be big after all.

I see hope that Apple will soon re-imagine the mobile device again. Consumers are craving a new way, simpler method of connecting and communicating. Stagnant iPhone growth shows that we’ve hit a wall of all the doo dads and new wrappers that simply boost the current experience. But I see a glimmer of

I see hope that Apple will soon re-imagine the mobile device again. Consumers are craving a new way, simpler method of connecting and communicating. Stagnant iPhone growth shows that we’ve hit a wall of all the doo dads and new wrappers that simply boost the current experience. But I see a glimmer of change with Apple’s introduction of screen time, grayscale, health monitoring, which potentially forecasts the company’s testing of a new experience that combats the addictive tech dependencies and negative impacts of its tentpole product. Holding out hope for a re-imagining as Apple approaches an anniversary year :)

Desi digital

Google spells out its future

Google wants to be more sustainable, but... The tech giant debuted several new devices at its hardware event today, few of which seem very recyclable.

Google wants to be more sustainable—nevermind all the new products it announced

The main thrust of Google's new product event today was to raise awareness to the way it and other manufacturers produce devices for mass consumption. It's making products from recycled plastic, and wants to offset emission costs from its partners. At the same time, it introduced a whole bunch of new

The main thrust of Google's new product event today was to raise awareness to the way it and other manufacturers produce devices for mass consumption. It's making products from recycled plastic, and wants to offset emission costs from its partners. At the same time, it introduced a whole bunch of new devices, many of which don't seem particularly repairable or that different than what's come before. How do you square that circle?

The best tech news I've heard today: "Much like Amazon's newest Echo products, users can ask Google Assistant on the hub to turn off wifi access to specific devices connected to the network, meaning parents can wield a new level of tyranny over unruly kids and their connected devices."

Including recycled materials in device design is all well and good, but real sustainability will mean creating repairable, upgradable gadgets. Project Ara's modular smartphone always seemed like a bit of a pipe dream, and its death in 2016 wasn't a huge surprise. But long-term, could Google resurrect a similar concept?

Retail roundup

Quartz at work

There are many paths to a dream career. Like studying salamanders in isolation, for example. The solitude of science helped podcast host Arielle Duhaime-Ross come to an important professional realization.

To find your dream career, try studying salamanders in isolation

This story resonates for me. Started my career as a Natural Resource scientist and manager. Mid-career pivot to leadership development coach. Turns out there are a lot of social skills one develops when promoting policy and management with multiple stakeholders.

Chinese technocracy

See you later, friends!

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Don’€™t Eat Before Reading This

Don’€™t Eat Before Reading This

Read more on The New Yorker

From Our Members

  • The piece that started it all. I also didn't realize that this was the first time that AB called out the brunch crowd (guilty!), vegetarians, and the "Hezbollah-like splinter faction" known as vegans. Butter is wonderful. The man had bite!

    Also, this line should be framed:

    "In America, the professional

    The piece that started it all. I also didn't realize that this was the first time that AB called out the brunch crowd (guilty!), vegetarians, and the "Hezbollah-like splinter faction" known as vegans. Butter is wonderful. The man had bite!

    Also, this line should be framed:

    "In America, the professional kitchen is the last refuge of the misfit. It’s a place for people with bad pasts to find a new family. It’s a haven for foreigners—Ecuadorians, Mexicans, Chinese, Senegalese, Egyptians, Poles. In New York, the main linguistic spice is Spanish. “Hey, maricón! chupa mis huevos” means, roughly, “How are you, valued comrade? I hope all is well.” And you hear “Hey, baboso! Put some more brown jiz on the fire and check your meez before the sous comes back there and fucks you in the culo!,” which means “Please reduce some additional demi-glace, brother, and reëxamine your mise en place, because the sous-chef is concerned about your state of readiness.”

    That first sentence hits me hard. We'll miss you, Tony. 💔

  • The New Yorker piece that launched Anthony Bourdain's writing career.

  • The Anthony Bourdain piece that launched him as the writer/journalist/groundbreaker we know/love/remember him as. RIP Chef.

  • "Good food, good eating, is all about blood and organs, cruelty and decay. It’s about sodium-loaded pork fat, stinky triple-cream cheeses, the tender thymus glands and distended livers of young animals...

    Even more despised than the Brunch People are the vegetarians. Serious cooks regard these members

    "Good food, good eating, is all about blood and organs, cruelty and decay. It’s about sodium-loaded pork fat, stinky triple-cream cheeses, the tender thymus glands and distended livers of young animals...

    Even more despised than the Brunch People are the vegetarians. Serious cooks regard these members of the dining public—and their Hezbollah-like splinter faction, the vegans—as enemies of everything that’s good and decent in the human spirit. To live life without veal or chicken stock, fish cheeks, sausages, cheese, or organ meats is treasonous."

  • Have you ever read a line so well-written that you just shut the book and stare at the wall. That’s how his writing style and talent hits me. He told stories where we aren’t made to know, but made to wonder.

  • The piece that kicked it all off

  • Hits me in the heart so hard. I, too learned more Spanish in my 12 years of restaurant service than any school can teach you. I started at age 15. Watching a line cook in Soho pull berries out of the garbage can and scrape off the mold to serve. Drunks in a 24 hour diner in Baltimore asking me...I won’t

    Hits me in the heart so hard. I, too learned more Spanish in my 12 years of restaurant service than any school can teach you. I started at age 15. Watching a line cook in Soho pull berries out of the garbage can and scrape off the mold to serve. Drunks in a 24 hour diner in Baltimore asking me...I won’t repeat that. I feel you Anthony. And you are loved and missed brother.

  • So many people talked about this article that the “Don’t order fish on Monday” thing became a real issue for NYC restaurants.

  • An amazing look into a world I have never understood. Before this, the extent of my chef knowledge came from Pixar’s Ratatouille. His writing style evokes so many emotions for the reader-that first paragraph, for example. Yikes...

    The descriptions he gave of the people the chefs don’t like are simply

    An amazing look into a world I have never understood. Before this, the extent of my chef knowledge came from Pixar’s Ratatouille. His writing style evokes so many emotions for the reader-that first paragraph, for example. Yikes...

    The descriptions he gave of the people the chefs don’t like are simply classic and I love the way he disclosed all of the dirty secrets about fish and meat on Monday night. I hate to think about how many times I’ve eaten out and received food from questionable storage conditions. I may never eat out again (at least not on Mondays!

  • This brilliant piece of writing from 1999 kicked off Anthony Bourdain’s writing and TV careers and just confirms how unspeakably sad it is that we have lost him to suicide.

  • It is horrible we don’t know where the foods we eat come from.

  • I still don't get this article totally. I mean I love the fact that it made us conscious of what we eat and what it is made up... But.. Why? Everyone eats what's best for them for healthy living and as long as required nutrients are derived. Even quite a number of people with different conditions select

    I still don't get this article totally. I mean I love the fact that it made us conscious of what we eat and what it is made up... But.. Why? Everyone eats what's best for them for healthy living and as long as required nutrients are derived. Even quite a number of people with different conditions select food, so I bet I would fall into a category whose preference for spaghetti or even pizza makes it all. (lol). I am not trying to make fun of anything at all, I just wished I saw something different and not chemical about food. this is best suitable on books for geeks who wants to know all about food.

  • 1999 New Yorker article by Anthony Bourdain

  • Great read!

  • We’ll miss him!!