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Lorenzo Gritti

Good morning.

In case you missed it

The escalating Syria conflict

What comes after the iPhone?

Can Apple do it again? The iPhone turned Apple from a successful computer company into the world’s most profitable consumer electronics operation. But as this Quartz member exclusive shows, its success could also spell Apple’s undoing.

Can Apple do it again?

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This is the most sensible strategy in the near term while they work on the next big thing which may not be big after all.

Apple’s streaming service is surrounded by questions. We know that Apple TV+ will cost $4.99, that it’ll launch on Nov. 1 with eight original series, and that it won’t have ads. But most of the rest is still a mystery.

Trying to dominate TV is like nothing Apple has ever done before

It is smart to offer the service at $5/month...

I am not convinced that Apple will dominate original content out of the gate. It would depend heavily upon personnel. Everyone loves to festoon Netflix and Amazon with developmental praise but from what I’ve seen, most of their best content is leftovers

It is smart to offer the service at $5/month...

I am not convinced that Apple will dominate original content out of the gate. It would depend heavily upon personnel. Everyone loves to festoon Netflix and Amazon with developmental praise but from what I’ve seen, most of their best content is leftovers from things developed elsewhere. I truly believe that unless you bring on the behind-the-scenes creatives, your front-of-house content will not have the same depth and stamina boasted by the long term heavy hitters like HBO. Not to mention half of what Netflix distributes was created entirely independent of the studio, which is cool and great but doesn’t prove that the newcomers have the secret sauce recipe. It just indicates they can recognize another’s well conceived ideas and then distribute them, which is a very smart way to build your catalogue and brand loyalty while waiting for the truly original content to resonate. Apple doesn’t have a catalogue and the current trend of pulling libraries is likely to continue.

Apple did right to bring over some great industry heavy hitters but imagining yourself as a direct competitor of HBO is a bit like me taking my first novel to Random House.

Trump’s Italy connection

Literary polemics

Economics Nobel prize

The Nobel prize for economic sciences was announced. The joint winners are Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo, and Michael Kremer, for their work in alleviating global poverty.

Three professors won the 2019 Nobel prize for economics for their work on fighting poverty

In India, where he was born and completed his early studies, the praise for Banerjee might be grudging, at best. He is not a supporter of the current government and has been a dissenting voice on several key issues. As I write this, the prime minister, so prolific on social media, is yet to offer any

In India, where he was born and completed his early studies, the praise for Banerjee might be grudging, at best. He is not a supporter of the current government and has been a dissenting voice on several key issues. As I write this, the prime minister, so prolific on social media, is yet to offer any congratulations to only the tenth Nobel laureate of Indian origin.

The last Nobel for poverty alleviation went to Muhammad Yunus, the Bangladeshi social entrepreneur, banker and economist, for founding the Grameen Bank and pioneering the concepts of microcredit and microfinance. But he didn’t get an economics Nobel. He won the Peace Prize. It seems significant that

The last Nobel for poverty alleviation went to Muhammad Yunus, the Bangladeshi social entrepreneur, banker and economist, for founding the Grameen Bank and pioneering the concepts of microcredit and microfinance. But he didn’t get an economics Nobel. He won the Peace Prize. It seems significant that the work of Esther Duflo and her longtime collaborator and partner Abhijit Banerjee (as well as Michael Kremer) has been recognised in this way. That too, just days ahead of the UN’s International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, a rather anodyne designation, but now given a new focus. A different-strokes-for-different-folks approach that truly tries to understood how the poor make decisions about housing, healthcare, hygiene products even.

Two ideas for greener travels

China’s culture wars

China’s propaganda app can snoop into users’ phones. The Chinese Communist Party bills its app as a fun educational tool. But it can learn the habits of more than 100 million users.

An app to teach Xi Jinping thought can study the phones of its 100 million users

Funny, you’d figure the CCP would have co-opted Weibo to do exactly the same thing - but with a great many more users. Of course, there is nothing that says it hasn’t done that also. More of the same from China’s all glorious, just and far seeing Communist Party.

Come back soon

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States are spying on teens' social media to stop the next school shooting

Texas' new iWatch app will share information with the Department of Homeland Security's anti-terror "fusion centers."

Read more on Vice News

From Our Members

  • This is a terrifying police state turn of events, and I’ll be interested to see if teenage surveillance ends up being challenged in courts. As the article points out, this will lead to so many false positives, and will be a huge drain on police resources, but will also put students, particularly those

    This is a terrifying police state turn of events, and I’ll be interested to see if teenage surveillance ends up being challenged in courts. As the article points out, this will lead to so many false positives, and will be a huge drain on police resources, but will also put students, particularly those of color, at risk each time they encounter a cop in an intense situation where the cop starts with the premise that the child may be armed and/or dangerous. This is a disaster waiting to happen.

  • It is absolutely terrifying that the government will use technology and data to monitor students’ behavior, but not to make it more difficult to get a gun. Creating a virtual police state is not the answer to this problem.

  • Well, I’m familiar with AI and I remember being a teenager. I’m also familiar with the FBI and how they share information. I don’t think this surveillance is a good idea. First, teenagers, especially boys, are growing up in a brave new world and the opportunities to explore and be active and just be

    Well, I’m familiar with AI and I remember being a teenager. I’m also familiar with the FBI and how they share information. I don’t think this surveillance is a good idea. First, teenagers, especially boys, are growing up in a brave new world and the opportunities to explore and be active and just be stupid sometimes are increasingly limited. We cant have law enforcement hovering over kids just because they have undeveloped brains.

    Secondly, AI is not a silver bullet (no pun intended) its just a tool, all it can do is mindlessly comb over mountains of data and make predictions based on patterns. There is no guarantee it will be correct without a human in the loop. Yes, its true AI can spot cancer in some cases better than a doctor but linguistic context is harder to identify if your not actually there and you don’t actually know the person your talking about. If someone types, “im going to kill you” are they speaking abstractly, as a joke, or are they serious? AI will never pick that up. Lastly, there are databases that can be created about school shooters in order to identify the most vulnerable students. The majority of shooters are male, from broken or single parent homes, and on medications that exacerbate their problems. Cruz, whose parents were both dead, was reported to the police over 25 times. He was reported to the FBI at least twice. The school knew about him. The community has a responsibility to inform and law enforcement has a responsibility to act. We don’t need 9/11 style fusion centers with no checks and balances chasing after teenagers, thats very Orwellian.

    School shootings are not random, they are actually, sadly, quite predictable. But only if human beings are actually looking at the right data.

  • It’s heartbreaking to feel there are no good solutions. All of this talk of extensive AI surveillance seems like it’s straight out of a dystopian novel. We don’t want teenagers to be so regulated and spied on that they don’t feel free to be themselves, or even explore personas at will. There is such

    It’s heartbreaking to feel there are no good solutions. All of this talk of extensive AI surveillance seems like it’s straight out of a dystopian novel. We don’t want teenagers to be so regulated and spied on that they don’t feel free to be themselves, or even explore personas at will. There is such a fine line between bluster and threats of real violence. It is a pressure that adolescents shouldn’t have to deal with - the deciding whether classmates are just high school villains or terrorists... yet here we are. We can only pray that these lawmakers and protective organizations find a healthy enough balance between a sharp eye and an invasion of privacy.

  • Slippery slope. I agree we need to stop the carnage. But at what point should the community accept some accountability for our own? These ideas and plans are seen by many. But too many of these same people do not know what to do or don’t take these plans seriously. This is what need to change. I’m not

    Slippery slope. I agree we need to stop the carnage. But at what point should the community accept some accountability for our own? These ideas and plans are seen by many. But too many of these same people do not know what to do or don’t take these plans seriously. This is what need to change. I’m not sure I like the idea that the government, whether police or FBI, should be give this freedom. Then again...it’s all public...right?

  • Or there will be an absence of social media. Too bad there isn’t funding for teachers and real counselors to spend time talking to students.

  • “But experts say that relying on social media mining tools and anonymous tips submitted through an app, as Texas is proposing, could lead to an onslaught of false information and make it harder to identify tips related to genuine threats.”

    This is common knowledge, right? Kids aren’t the most reliable

    “But experts say that relying on social media mining tools and anonymous tips submitted through an app, as Texas is proposing, could lead to an onslaught of false information and make it harder to identify tips related to genuine threats.”

    This is common knowledge, right? Kids aren’t the most reliable sources of valid information when given the opportunity to freely report things as they see fit. It’ll become a joke for many, which will lead to more problems than solutions. Like Christina, I’m also curious if the courts will question this. Surveillance of any demographic, but especially teenagers, is questionable. Not every post or report will be reliable. If I were a parent, I’d be well against this, even if I was committed to the safety of my child. There’s also danger behind this violation of privacy.

    I hope this doesn’t give people ideas and become a trend like swatting. Kids are already vulnerable enough without this.

  • Yet another band-aid on a deep societal problem. Something needs to be done to identify and address the underlying stressors or whatever is causing kids to shoot up their schools. Just like gun-control laws, this surveillance starts from the point of accepting that school shootings are just part of life

    Yet another band-aid on a deep societal problem. Something needs to be done to identify and address the underlying stressors or whatever is causing kids to shoot up their schools. Just like gun-control laws, this surveillance starts from the point of accepting that school shootings are just part of life now, meanwhile no one seems to be thinking seriously about what children experience that might set the condition for all this violence

  • I don’t have a problem with this at all, and here’s why; social media is a PUBLIC place/space, and if you don’t want the public to know, then don’t put it out there! Don’t like trolls; worried about your information falling into the wrong hands; ...etc. then don’t use it! At last check nobody is forcing you to use social media.

  • This is a disaster waiting to happen. I can see student falsely reporting each others because of immature jokes, teenage stupidity, racism, just to name a few.

    I do not believe this was well thought out by the authorities also if history is any indication teenagers will not report the threats. The

    This is a disaster waiting to happen. I can see student falsely reporting each others because of immature jokes, teenage stupidity, racism, just to name a few.

    I do not believe this was well thought out by the authorities also if history is any indication teenagers will not report the threats. The notion that teenagers will share information with the government is very unlikely.

    Do teenagers share this info with there parents now?

  • This is something their parents should be doing.