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This robot restaurant says it's paying employees $16 an hour to read books

By Business Insider

Creator Creator, a Silicon Valley startup backed by GV (Google Ventures), is finally opening its long-awaited burger restaurant in San Francisco on June 27. A robot in the center of the restaurantRead full story

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  • David Buffaloe
    David Buffaloe

    If you can get them reading I’m all for it. Ignorance today is at plague levels. Let’s put down the game controllers, remote controls, and READ

  • Susie L
    Susie Lmom/grandmom at my family

    I think it's amazing that a burger restaurant Silicon Valley would do this. It would give the employees enough time to read and learn. The timing and accuracy should not be issue because with robotic system like this, every movement and ingredient should be precise. However, this would be horribly expensive to install, and it would probably be very expensive to service. As long as this is reliable, though I imagine that it would be. A robot is perfect for you to cook with as long as you had it programmed

    I think it's amazing that a burger restaurant Silicon Valley would do this. It would give the employees enough time to read and learn. The timing and accuracy should not be issue because with robotic system like this, every movement and ingredient should be precise. However, this would be horribly expensive to install, and it would probably be very expensive to service. As long as this is reliable, though I imagine that it would be. A robot is perfect for you to cook with as long as you had it programmed correctly, to get the food nice and done.

  • Helen Hoefele
    Helen HoefeleBlogger at HelenHoefele.com

    I'm not seeing how this becomes less expensive than what it costs to run a typical fast food burger place. It looks like they are just shifting people costs to machinery costs. The people you are paying $16 an hour to develop higher level skills that the business can eventually employ is probably something that looks good on paper, but isn't that realistic in real life. The learning curve for new technologies, especially to develop the right level of expertise, practical application experience, and

    I'm not seeing how this becomes less expensive than what it costs to run a typical fast food burger place. It looks like they are just shifting people costs to machinery costs. The people you are paying $16 an hour to develop higher level skills that the business can eventually employ is probably something that looks good on paper, but isn't that realistic in real life. The learning curve for new technologies, especially to develop the right level of expertise, practical application experience, and efficiency, is probably much longer than is likely practical for this sort of plan. Maybe I'm just a doubter. Still, idealistically, it sounds good though.

  • Nick Palmer
    Nick Palmersemi-retired

    those condemning the move from employees to robots are in the sand. and some seem to be running companies. how far removed are you from what it costs to employ a human being?

  • David Yakobovitch
    David YakobovitchAI Professor at Galvanize

    The move to AI automation is beginning very fast today.

  • David Landau
    David LandauManaging Partner

    Wild

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