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Anasticia Sholik

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SCOTUS update

The world's eyes are on a US child abduction case. The supreme court will decide how to apply international law in the case of a mother taking her daughter from Italy to the US to flee her allegedly abusive ex-husband.

A case about international child abduction law has the world watching SCOTUS

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea that your once true love will take off with your child to another land.

This week the US Supreme Court will consider just such a horror story, the tale of a small child separated from her mother and at the center of an international custody dispute of global significance.

Trump and the courts

Objectivity is on trial in Trump's impeachment hearings. A republican congressman sought to undermine a panel of four legal experts by asking whether they voted for Donald Trump—attacking a core principle of the judiciary system that people can put biases aside and act impartially.

The concept of objectivity is under attack at the Trump impeachment hearings

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars testifying, questioning their objectivity and suggesting that they could not possibly be unbiased if they didn't reveal how they voted in the last presidential elections. And with each observer they manage to convince of this impossibility, we all lose a little bit more.

Trump's taxes will stay secret, for now. Trump argues that, as the president, his financial records are special. Lower courts have disagreed—but the US Supreme Court has granted the president's legal team more time to work on their petition.

The Supreme Court grants Trump’s emergency stay in financial records case

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't signaling her approval of Trump's legal stance, just giving him time to file a petition for review, and it happened to be her because the justices rotate duties with respect to emergency applications. Now the House of Representatives must respond by Dec. 11 and the justices will ultimately have to decide if they want to walk into this political landmine and accept review of three financial matters dealing with Trump's records and his claims the executive is special.

Metals.com scam

Amazon attrition

At the movies

Fashion forward

Reshaping society

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

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Scientists are now growing Neanderthal mini brains in the lab

Scientists are now growing Neanderthal mini brains in the lab

Read more on CNET

Contributions

  • Reminds me of the movie “Ghost in the Shell” where Scarlett Johansson’s brain is real but her body is manufactured, connecting brain to robot to create something new. Crazy to think that we are headed in that direction. Movie not recommended.

  • Aren’t all Neanderthal brains mini brains?

    Stupid Neanderthals.

  • CRISPR technology is fascinating and has the potential to be pivotal in treating historically difficult or even untreatable diseases, but I can’t agree with using this technology to create cyborg crabs.

    As a matter of personal opinion, the CRISPR line should be drawn at improving the quality of life

    CRISPR technology is fascinating and has the potential to be pivotal in treating historically difficult or even untreatable diseases, but I can’t agree with using this technology to create cyborg crabs.

    As a matter of personal opinion, the CRISPR line should be drawn at improving the quality of life of those predisposed to genetic conditions; otherwise, we could very quickly find ourselves living in a dystopia-like world where parents create designer babies and every family has a house cyborg to child rear and do the chores...think of a hybrid between iRobot and Gattaca.

  • This does sound like something out of a sci-fi movie. While, I can see the merits of being able to test certain aspects of the brains, it brings to mine the question of do they become sentient. I'm not sure what scale they are taking this to however, it can be a slippery slope. So, as long as they are

    This does sound like something out of a sci-fi movie. While, I can see the merits of being able to test certain aspects of the brains, it brings to mine the question of do they become sentient. I'm not sure what scale they are taking this to however, it can be a slippery slope. So, as long as they are using these techniques properly and not doing anything that could be considered cruel or inhuman then I could see you still using this technology. The question is what are they wanting to test on them. Would you really be able to get that much information from a brain that you grew in a petri dish. Other than cellular structure, chemical compositions, sensory paths, structural makeup, and possibly DNA. I'm sure there are some other things that I'm not thinking of but I am a layman in this.

  • But why do they have to pit the neanderoid crabots against each other? Humans kill each other enough already.

  • Fred Flintstone did not endorse this article!

  • Who ever said playing God isn’t fun?

  • I’m not sure what to say about this as it has a very strong feel of “playing God”, and I’m honestly not sure how i feel about that. It’s interesting that they have linked similar wirings to those of humans with mental disabilities. I’m not sure exactly where they plan to go with putting the brains in

    I’m not sure what to say about this as it has a very strong feel of “playing God”, and I’m honestly not sure how i feel about that. It’s interesting that they have linked similar wirings to those of humans with mental disabilities. I’m not sure exactly where they plan to go with putting the brains in robots but I do wonder if this will be a huge step toward a better understanding of autism and schizophrenia.