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Alessandro Cripsta

Good afternoon.

Reflecting on Volcker's rule

The New Purpose of Companies

Beyond the fintech hype

Deep-pocketed investors are pouring money into fintech companies, but which are for real and which will fade? Quartz's latest field guide surveys ten unicorns to explain what's changing in financial services, and what's just driven by fear of missing out. ✦

Beyond the fintech hype

Is there a fintech bubble? Our guide uncovered a distinct fear of missing out among investors—venture capital funds are shoveling cash into money losing startups, and even more money into the few that are profitable.

A few themes emerge from the haze of hype: many of the most valuable fintech startups

Is there a fintech bubble? Our guide uncovered a distinct fear of missing out among investors—venture capital funds are shoveling cash into money losing startups, and even more money into the few that are profitable.

A few themes emerge from the haze of hype: many of the most valuable fintech startups are in emerging markets, as investors hope to make bundle by extending financial services to people who have traditionally lacked them.

Another theme is that many of these companies have unremarkable business models. Among them are banks, brokers, and payment companies. They seem more like finance companies that tech companies. If that's right, they should be valued accordingly.

This paragraph stands out: "Perhaps the most surprising thing about the most highly valued fintechs is how ordinary some of them are. They usually rely on software that’s hosted in the cloud, and their apps have whizzy interfaces. Otherwise, many of them act a lot like regular financial companies. They

This paragraph stands out: "Perhaps the most surprising thing about the most highly valued fintechs is how ordinary some of them are. They usually rely on software that’s hosted in the cloud, and their apps have whizzy interfaces. Otherwise, many of them act a lot like regular financial companies. They process payments, take deposits, make loans, and, in one case, provide brokerage for stock and options trading."

Quartz at work

The gig is up

The nature of cities

Impeachment today

Big Tech discovers Africa

Global freedom of expression

Rohingya get a day in court

Making space for women

Most cities aren't built for women cyclists. Women are much less likely to commute to work by bike than men, and many cite safety as their main concern. By building out bike infrastructure, cities like Copenhagen have reached cycling gender parity—and made the roads safer for everyone.

Women love bikes—so why don’t they cycle to work?

As a woman cycling to work in suits on the regular I was pretty pissed about this headline, which like so many stories about gender apparently reflects a truth but sounds like more of the same old dated tale about women being exceptionally delicate creatures. Anyhow, it's true that it's more fun to bike

As a woman cycling to work in suits on the regular I was pretty pissed about this headline, which like so many stories about gender apparently reflects a truth but sounds like more of the same old dated tale about women being exceptionally delicate creatures. Anyhow, it's true that it's more fun to bike where it's safe but I doubt very much that men don't also appreciate bike lanes. Unfortunate approach to this story that sells short all cyclists, and especially women.

In the world of transit advocacy there is a useful rubric called the 8-80 rule, which encourages us to think about designing cities in such a way that both an 8 year-old and an 80 year-old can comfortably and safely get around. Instead, most cities prioritize cars and leave everyone else - cyclists and

In the world of transit advocacy there is a useful rubric called the 8-80 rule, which encourages us to think about designing cities in such a way that both an 8 year-old and an 80 year-old can comfortably and safely get around. Instead, most cities prioritize cars and leave everyone else - cyclists and pedestrians alike - to fend for themselves. This has led to a survival of the fittest view of urban life that is wildly discriminatory and outdated.

Thankfully, urban cycling benefits from a well-documented safety-in-numbers effect. By choosing to ride a bike you're not only benefitting yourself, you're also making your city a safer place for everybody to enjoy.

This validated and confirmed so many of the internal and external questions I have had to face as a bike owner (and aspiring cyclist) in NYC, more often than not my bike stays home for all the reasons that were broken down

"That was totally worth it"

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Seattle Flirts with ‘Municipal Socialism’

Seattle Flirts with ‘Municipal Socialism’

Read more on POLITICO

Contributions

  • I am glad experimentation with labor policy is happening at the municipal level. We need more diversity to find how to maintain a high quality of life for the most Americans we can. Although this piece covered more than a higher minimum wage (such as a worker Bill of Rights), I fear that a higher minimum

    I am glad experimentation with labor policy is happening at the municipal level. We need more diversity to find how to maintain a high quality of life for the most Americans we can. Although this piece covered more than a higher minimum wage (such as a worker Bill of Rights), I fear that a higher minimum wage is a dead end. Study after study confirms that raising the minimum wage hurts small business and encourages large ones to invest in automation technologies. For example, here come the hamburger-making robots and the self-driving Ubers...

  • "Yet, it’s the kind of assertiveness that Uber and the rest of corporate America will probably have to get used to."

    I'm not entirely sure why the author thinks the rest of the country (especially corporate companies) are going to just get on board with what Seattle is testing out. There's a reason

    "Yet, it’s the kind of assertiveness that Uber and the rest of corporate America will probably have to get used to."

    I'm not entirely sure why the author thinks the rest of the country (especially corporate companies) are going to just get on board with what Seattle is testing out. There's a reason why cities like Seattle, Boulder, and Austin remain pockets of radical leftist ideas - the vast remainder of the country isn't willing to gamble it's future on policies that run against the grain of America's founding philosophies.

  • Although I think the repercussions of some of it's policies, like the recently reversed $250 per head employee tax, will be disastrous in the long term. This is a good stage to do this. At the local level, the government can experiment. The consequences are restricted to that area. If good, others copy

    Although I think the repercussions of some of it's policies, like the recently reversed $250 per head employee tax, will be disastrous in the long term. This is a good stage to do this. At the local level, the government can experiment. The consequences are restricted to that area. If good, others copy. If bad, others learn. And the residents can decide to vote a new council if they don't like the policies. I think companies like Amazon will be planning an exit strategy though.

  • City Councils are the new Teamsters.

  • I keep it simple’ Healthcare’ Education ‘ Affordable housing ‘

    The foundation of a civilized society.

    If any of those three are out of reach than the house will tumble!

  • I like hearing that there are cities taking steps to protect domestic help. They have long been subjected to abuse, disrespect and low wages due to being in “low end” job but that doesn’t make them any less important in the big picture. I’m on the fence about higher wages, I do believe everyone deserves

    I like hearing that there are cities taking steps to protect domestic help. They have long been subjected to abuse, disrespect and low wages due to being in “low end” job but that doesn’t make them any less important in the big picture. I’m on the fence about higher wages, I do believe everyone deserves a living wage but we also need businesses who will be willing to pay those wages instead of taking their business overseas where they can get cheaper help.

  • Genius. The current minimum wage increase in Seattle prompted businesses to cut the hours of low-skilled workers. They are now earning $125 less a month than they did before the hike.

  • This is a joke, right? ... right???

  • I hope Seattle keeps doing these type of policy moves. It just makes the other parts of the state more attractive to businesses. ~Eastern Washingtonian

  • Hehe that’s laughable!

  • This is a good move for Seattle and the rest of America should follow. Well-compensated workers are more productive. Companies should not see this as an additional overhead cost bust as an improvement on their services. Those companies who are against this are for sure those who are earning millions

    This is a good move for Seattle and the rest of America should follow. Well-compensated workers are more productive. Companies should not see this as an additional overhead cost bust as an improvement on their services. Those companies who are against this are for sure those who are earning millions and millions of dollars from the hard work of minimum wagers.

  • Bravo for Seattle!!!

  • Sad...yet not surprising.