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Zack Rosebrugh

Good evening.

Impeachment updates

A legal expert explains the “smoking gun” in the impeachment probe. The key piece of evidence in president Trump's impeachment inquiry—the July 25 call—has already been out for months. Robert Litt, a former general counsel to the Director of National Intelligence, explains why it’s so important.

The “smoking gun” in the Trump impeachment inquiry explained

As lawmakers take testimony from eight witnesses in the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump's Ukraine dealings this week, key details threaten to get lost in the deluge of information and political spin.

I spoke to a national security expert who advises staying focused on the July 25 phone call between

As lawmakers take testimony from eight witnesses in the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump's Ukraine dealings this week, key details threaten to get lost in the deluge of information and political spin.

I spoke to a national security expert who advises staying focused on the July 25 phone call between the US and Ukrainian presidents and the way the Trump administration handled it. By storing the call record on a server with highly restricted access and following an unusual process for compiling and editing the "transcript," the administration's actions speak louder than its vociferous denials of wrongdoing.

Unicorn hunting

The youth vote

A new study shows young US voters are really bad at spotting fake news. High school students who were shown a grainy video in which poll workers appear to stuff ballots concluded that it provided “strong evidence” of voter fraud in the 2016 Democratic primaries. It had actually been shot in Russia.

A new Stanford study shows young US 2020 voters are really bad at spotting fake news

Getting rid of online misinformation and its many pitfalls will require more than observations, statements or complains. Instead, new social media must be developed with inherent tools to deal with misinformation vigorously. Also, the role of scientists in this fight should not be overlooked since they

Getting rid of online misinformation and its many pitfalls will require more than observations, statements or complains. Instead, new social media must be developed with inherent tools to deal with misinformation vigorously. Also, the role of scientists in this fight should not be overlooked since they are among the best equipped to take part in this battle.

Cultivating resilience

The human brain is the most resilient organ in the body. Understanding how most brains maintain youthful plasticity could lead scientists to figure out why some don't.

How the human brain stays young even as we age

As a health reporter, I think a lot about what happens when aging goes awry in the brain, leading to dementias. Dementia is tragic, and thankfully only happens to about 8% of older adults.

But here’s a plot twist: scientists are still figuring out what typical aging looks like in the brain! The brain

As a health reporter, I think a lot about what happens when aging goes awry in the brain, leading to dementias. Dementia is tragic, and thankfully only happens to about 8% of older adults.

But here’s a plot twist: scientists are still figuring out what typical aging looks like in the brain! The brain is arguably the most dynamic organ in our whole bodies, and it changes over time to accommodate wear and tear so our mental faculties don’t slow down. How they do this is still a mystery! I loved exploring some of the research and theories for this piece.

Hong Kong protests

Mining for silver

The future of work

In the age of burnout, how do companies keep their employees coming back? As workplaces become more flexible about leaves and sabbaticals, managing the return to the office is becoming a business in its own right.

In the age of burnout, how companies keep their employees coming back

We normally keep the personal out of our professional lives at work—but burnout has gotten so bad it's impossible to ignore. Teaching workers resilience can keep them in the workplace for longer if they can learn to cope with major life changes on top of evolving employment.

ETFs are eating the market

Environmental concerns

Spotify's podcast ambitions

Spotify wants to treat podcasts like music playlists. If 'Your Daily Podcasts' expedite discovery, that would be a win for listeners and hosts alike. But Spotify will have to prove it can turn up more gems than sludge.

Spotify wants to treat podcasts like music playlists

The biggest problem with podcasts is not finding them. It is, for the ones that grow a story over time, listening from episode 1. And even ones where you could listen from now assume you have listened from episode 1, so you still can’t just start from today.....

The African market

Gaming's next frontier

Virtual reality is too boring. Fast Company writes that developers haven’t given us a good enough reason to leave our own realities behind in favor of their artificial worlds.

The big problem with virtual reality? It’s almost as boring as real life

I feel like this article only focuses on the enterprise applications of VR, which of course are not for everyday people. In the wake of Valve announcing their first flagship VR game, Alyx, this article is incredibly narrow.

Thanks for keeping it real.

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Why Are Young Billionaires So Boring?

Why Are Young Billionaires So Boring?

Read more on Bloomberg

From Our Members

  • This part of the story is particularly incisive: “there’s something missing from the foundational stories of this new group of self-made men (yes, they’re mostly men)...today's prototypical founding story involves an upper-middle-class childhood,early access to a computer, & an elite education”... what

    This part of the story is particularly incisive: “there’s something missing from the foundational stories of this new group of self-made men (yes, they’re mostly men)...today's prototypical founding story involves an upper-middle-class childhood,early access to a computer, & an elite education”... what are the dangers that come with a new elite group of billionaires with that homogenous background?

  • Agree with Max and of course it’s well documented that upward mobility is on the decline and the chasm between the wealthy and the low income earners is growing deeper by the day. What I find a bit odd, is using a few of the wealthiest men as a new trend barometer of who will ultimately succeed to the

    Agree with Max and of course it’s well documented that upward mobility is on the decline and the chasm between the wealthy and the low income earners is growing deeper by the day. What I find a bit odd, is using a few of the wealthiest men as a new trend barometer of who will ultimately succeed to the top of the 1% pile. There are so many stories of poor kids from Queens and Brooklyn rising through the corporate ranks and becoming titans of not just Wall Street but also fashion and media.

    The next Mark Z , if there is one, will likely come from a middle class background and go to a good school but there will be plenty of Shahid Kahn’s (auto part magnate who owns Fulham and Jacksonville Jags) who are self made billionaires—he might not crack the top 5 richest Americans but he’s doing alright for himself. I remember reading another story on NewsPicks that portrayed many of the most successful business people as having suffered tragedy or economically —a long winded way of saying I would take this billionaire tech story with a grain of salt. There are plenty of coders who are making a decent living but nothing out of the ordinary.

  • I think if you look back through history you’ll see that many of the wealthiest people in history had a leg up. Perhaps not in a traditional (education and pedigree) sense, but true advantages. Vanderbilt’s dad had a skiff boat that got him started transporting people between Manhattan and Staten Island

    I think if you look back through history you’ll see that many of the wealthiest people in history had a leg up. Perhaps not in a traditional (education and pedigree) sense, but true advantages. Vanderbilt’s dad had a skiff boat that got him started transporting people between Manhattan and Staten Island. Rockefeller’s dad was a bit of a con man and hustler. He must have learned a trick or two to control 90% of the oil in the country at one point in time. We focus on these extreme .0001% cases because they shape our lives —which is what makes them so interesting. They’re the ones who set the rules that the regular strivers of their era operate within.

  • It's not just billionaires who now almost exclusively arise from the ranks of the upper quintile of earners. Mobility is down across the board.

    This lack of diversity among our commercial giants also just leads to a dull same-ness of the digital products we use today. This is why NewsPicks feels different

    It's not just billionaires who now almost exclusively arise from the ranks of the upper quintile of earners. Mobility is down across the board.

    This lack of diversity among our commercial giants also just leads to a dull same-ness of the digital products we use today. This is why NewsPicks feels different. It comes from a different country with a different perspective. Big fan 🙂

  • Building a technology company is now undeniably the fastest path to wealth (except inheritance, but nobody counts that). No longer is starting an auto-parts store and expanding into an empire, or a restaurant chain, or a new beverage line what young men and women dream of because, well, it seems like

    Building a technology company is now undeniably the fastest path to wealth (except inheritance, but nobody counts that). No longer is starting an auto-parts store and expanding into an empire, or a restaurant chain, or a new beverage line what young men and women dream of because, well, it seems like a lot of hard work and it's extremely not sexy. But in those businesses, the playing field is more equal and in technology it is certainly not.

    The education and knowledge gap required to build a technology company vs. start a restaurant is immense and as a result, it is only natural that those who can afford to study, go to college, and receive top educations are the majority of beneficiaries.

  • “In some ways, it's great to live in the age of the nerd. And it’s tough to mourn the decline of Wall Street-style corporate machismo. But a poor kid growing up today may find it much harder to emulate the life path of someone like Zuckerberg, who coded an instant messaging system before hitting puberty

    “In some ways, it's great to live in the age of the nerd. And it’s tough to mourn the decline of Wall Street-style corporate machismo. But a poor kid growing up today may find it much harder to emulate the life path of someone like Zuckerberg, who coded an instant messaging system before hitting puberty, than that of even Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein, who grew up in Brooklyn housing projects and at one point served concessions at Yankee Stadium to earn extra money.

    Statistically as well as anecdotally, true American rags-to-riches stories are getting rarer. Class mobility, as defined by the percentage of children who earn more than their parents, has been in a state of mostly uninterrupted decline since the 1940s. Economist Raj Chetty found that only about half of the children born in 1980 have surpassed their parents’ income. In 1940, that number exceeded 90 percent.

    Of course, most successful entrepreneurs have earnings that vastly outstrip their parents’. In fact, they outstrip the earnings of nearly every human in history.”

  • Unfortunately they are boring because they got their hands on technology sooner than others, however, they also saw fit where it’s benefits could be executed for social and financial gain. Call it boring, but coding is the new sexy.

  • Interference is also well calculated between race and between party as a means of distraction, expending our talented energies on facilitating dispute, instead of staying focused on where and how to make money that could elevate the poor earners into something more “successfully” pathed. Our focus as

    Interference is also well calculated between race and between party as a means of distraction, expending our talented energies on facilitating dispute, instead of staying focused on where and how to make money that could elevate the poor earners into something more “successfully” pathed. Our focus as a society on mundane and irrelevant issues is notoriously inhibiting to both personal and national growth.

  • For some time now, I've recognized the common denominator of an upbringing like Zuckerbergs among today's emerging leaders. And I'm quite riddled with mixed feelings on this matter.

    As a parent, thinking about the early decisions made involving my kids education really keeps me up at night. The generational

    For some time now, I've recognized the common denominator of an upbringing like Zuckerbergs among today's emerging leaders. And I'm quite riddled with mixed feelings on this matter.

    As a parent, thinking about the early decisions made involving my kids education really keeps me up at night. The generational correlations in this article are very relatable to me. My concerns are on a different spectrum than the ones my parents had for me growing up. To them, simply getting a college education meant I'd be positioned to rise above. But today, my point of view is that my kids will need to matriculate from Ivys or top tier schools at worst in order to maintain a relevant position in the market, let alone have a competitive edge. That then means ensuring they get into the right prep schools and preceding that entails entering a feeder grade school. That decision process starts at pre-K. So, the pressure is definitely on earlier than some of us realise. And the root of it isn't so much a matter of developing a Zuckerberg, but to simply ensure they are afforded the same opportunities and not faced with a limitations.

  • The rags to riches story is often more myth than fact, bolstered by a few self-made moguls. And yet this is the same myth that has driven American Conservatives for generations; that if you will only work hard enough, you too, can be a rags to riches story. It has been the credo that has allowed the

    The rags to riches story is often more myth than fact, bolstered by a few self-made moguls. And yet this is the same myth that has driven American Conservatives for generations; that if you will only work hard enough, you too, can be a rags to riches story. It has been the credo that has allowed the perpetuation of another myth in our young history: dark skinned people, immigrants and women are inferior to white men because they don’t work as hard and are not as motivated to succeed. Both myths have been detrimental to the overall success of these groups. These marginalized groups have had to work even harder to achieve less and yet many have. Thanks for covering this story.

  • This digital divide is one of the defining characteristics of the drop in mobility for lower income Americans. Rather than try to broadcast internet from balloons in Africa, perhaps one of these billionaires can just subsidize broadband for low income Americans as part of an entrepreneurship initiative

    This digital divide is one of the defining characteristics of the drop in mobility for lower income Americans. Rather than try to broadcast internet from balloons in Africa, perhaps one of these billionaires can just subsidize broadband for low income Americans as part of an entrepreneurship initiative? Pay for access to existing pipes and then layer skills training on top of that.

  • The point is that you can be successful in the US whether you are starting the race at the blocks or two feet from the finish line. It takes hard work, intelligence and luck. But America has made the race possible. Let's keep it that way by not creating trade wars and turning away immigrants at the door.

  • I also think people tend to fantasize and only remember success stories in the past. The income gap is greater now, but the rise from the very bottom seemed to be as hard in the past. Only when a country or an industry is facing excessive growth, like China, those paths may be a little more widely accessible.

  • The income gap is certainly widening and access to education may be an serious impediment to achieving access to the billionaire class. Still, to me, the content of this particular article is already dated and the details of the assessment are likely far too shortsighted. Today’s young billionaires are

    The income gap is certainly widening and access to education may be an serious impediment to achieving access to the billionaire class. Still, to me, the content of this particular article is already dated and the details of the assessment are likely far too shortsighted. Today’s young billionaires are tech savvy programmers who had access to higher education and middle class lifestyle amenities. Assuming those particular skills and circumstances are going to still be required for the next generation of billionaires is, well, stupid and irresponsible tea-leaf-level, subjective reporting. The billionaire, turn of the century industrialists could never have predicted an unborn paperboy, number cruncher like Warren Buffet would lead a future generation of ultra wealthy hedge fund managers. No one knows how an objective marketplace, that will buy what it needs, is going to react to the subjective passions of tomorrow’s entrepreneurs. Fortunately, a poor young kid in any part of the country who is going to be the next big thing is likely not reading this particularly well written Bloomberg nonsense.

  • A lot to digest here

  • I think now is in the middle of transition to the digitalization.

    I think it will be good era.

    Any places will not matter,but ourself will in order to achieve mindfullness.