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Condé Nast editors once got seriously amazing perks

By New York Post

Nothing could prepare Kim France, the founding editor of Lucky magazine, for the luxe life of a Condé Nast editor-in-chief. “The perks were really something,” said France, who launched the publicatRead full story

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  • Wow this unbelievable (but not surprising) Condé mean girl shade from Lesley Seymour:

    “The publishers are hiring editors who are less experienced. They are kids [who] don’t expect much. [Publishers] are giving them tiny salaries . . . [The EIC position] doesn’t come with the visibility or authority

    Wow this unbelievable (but not surprising) Condé mean girl shade from Lesley Seymour:

    “The publishers are hiring editors who are less experienced. They are kids [who] don’t expect much. [Publishers] are giving them tiny salaries . . . [The EIC position] doesn’t come with the visibility or authority [of the past]. I don’t even know who’s running Vanity Fair now,” said Seymour of Jones, 45, a former New York Times staffer who took over Vanity Fair from Carter in December.

  • As a former Editorial Director/EIC, it’s a tough position to be in. With revenue dwindling for advertising placed against editorial, the center has shifted to the commercial editors and the branded content teams. EIC has become a thankless job, thus the lower salaries, higher turnover, and drop in average

    As a former Editorial Director/EIC, it’s a tough position to be in. With revenue dwindling for advertising placed against editorial, the center has shifted to the commercial editors and the branded content teams. EIC has become a thankless job, thus the lower salaries, higher turnover, and drop in average age/tenure of those holding the position.

  • To echo the sentiments from the article, the shiny baubles distracted from what was actually important — real raises and 401ks. It reminds me of the crazy “perks” tech startups give their employees: the fancy parties, the free massages, the expensive retreats. All to hide from the fact that a lot of

    To echo the sentiments from the article, the shiny baubles distracted from what was actually important — real raises and 401ks. It reminds me of the crazy “perks” tech startups give their employees: the fancy parties, the free massages, the expensive retreats. All to hide from the fact that a lot of large startups would provide pretty crappy healthcare and no 401k matching. (At least when the tech boom was really going a few years ago)

  • I was never on staff at Conde and even I enjoyed many lunches “on Uncle Si”, just by being in the industry in general. Now that I write for VF, I guess I’ll consider those lunches advance perks. Point is, the Conde perks spread far and wide and touched many.

  • An we even imagine what it would look like if any of these companies had spent even 20% of that “perk” money on innovation, as in tech innovation back in the 80s-90s. What would the industry look like today?

  • The magazine business really was something!

  • The good old days of print.

  • Perks are one of those things that are easy to get used to and hard to get used to living without. I went from a company with lavish expense policies to one that was quite restrictive and frankly I grew to appreciate the fact that money wasn’t wasted on silly perks. Put it in my paycheck!

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