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A small Japanese city is facing a ninja shortage — even though the salary is $85,000

By Business Insider

Iga city in Japan is suffering from a ninja shortage. The city, which is about 280 miles from Tokyo in central Japan, claims to be the birthplace of the ninja. The mayor is hoping to bolster tourisRead full story

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  • My daughter has a pair of plastic nunchucks — I’ll start practicing now.

  • Iga can definitely borrow some strategy from Staten Island, where the Wu-Tang clan has successfully been using hip hop to promote ninjas since the early 90’s. I’d also like to share this article with the my grade school teachers who told me “ninja” was not a viable career path.

  • The salary is $23,000-85,000. That is an important bit of info to leave out of the headline.

    I would like to see them fund a hybrid military/trade school-style training program with a job contract. Prospective candidates get paid to study ninjitsu, all day long, for 4 years. Finish the course and you

    The salary is $23,000-85,000. That is an important bit of info to leave out of the headline.

    I would like to see them fund a hybrid military/trade school-style training program with a job contract. Prospective candidates get paid to study ninjitsu, all day long, for 4 years. Finish the course and you are under legal contract to serve for another 8 years as a performing ninja, at whatever the agreed wages are.

    Fringe benefit: Being able to walk into any group, be asked what you do for a living, and answer, "I'm a freaking NINJA!"

  • Timing is everything. If only Iga would have done this in the 1980’s when Ninja interest was huge. I have to admit, I even had a ninja costume and ran about the neighbor ducking behind trees and climbing on rooftops. All the ninja movies were big but in the 80’s and, I’m sure there were more young people

    Timing is everything. If only Iga would have done this in the 1980’s when Ninja interest was huge. I have to admit, I even had a ninja costume and ran about the neighbor ducking behind trees and climbing on rooftops. All the ninja movies were big but in the 80’s and, I’m sure there were more young people still living in the rural Japanese town. Unfortunately, we can’t go back in time . Although it doesn’t quite sound like ninja culture is going to save Iga, I will certainly add the town to my travel list.

  • First of all it’s crazy how low Japan’s unemployment rate is considering its population as of 2016 was 127 million. Astonishing yet is pandering to an archaic art form/skill set to save your economy. It’s laughable at best but maybe this article alone will peak the interest of someone unhappy with their

    First of all it’s crazy how low Japan’s unemployment rate is considering its population as of 2016 was 127 million. Astonishing yet is pandering to an archaic art form/skill set to save your economy. It’s laughable at best but maybe this article alone will peak the interest of someone unhappy with their current life and decide to relocate to rural Japan and learn Ninjutusu. What’s up with that wide pay gap? Crazier things have happened, it is 2018 after all.

  • "'Right now in Iga, we are working very hard to promote ninja tourism and get the most economic outcome. For example, we hold this ninja festival between late April to around the beginning of May. During this period visitors and also local people come here. Everybody will be dressed like a ninja and

    "'Right now in Iga, we are working very hard to promote ninja tourism and get the most economic outcome. For example, we hold this ninja festival between late April to around the beginning of May. During this period visitors and also local people come here. Everybody will be dressed like a ninja and walks around and enjoys themselves — but recently I feel that it's not enough.' ...Japan is experiencing a major tourist boom [overall]."

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