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A Tale of Two Sushi Chefs – Allison Baum – Medium

By Medium

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of beliefRead full story

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  • Really enjoying Allison Baum’s piece. As a fellow expat in Japan—and a cook— I experienced the full continuum of “so easy, anyone can do it, let me show you” chefs to “white people’s hands are too hot and sweaty to make this dish” chefs. Lots of memories.

  • Finding a breakthrough path to transition is when you reach a conclusion like this...

    “Beyond the delicious food, I felt I had found a kindred spirit in Sato-san, who like so many of us, struggled to fit in, and eventually stopped trying and learned to stand out.”

    Effective leaders never stop learning, they say yes, they see the meaning in things, and possess a special capacity to be taught by those with whom they come into contact.

  • A piece I wrote providing a glimpse into the future of work, and the ongoing struggle within us all as we transition from ‘the way things were’ to ‘the way things will be.’

  • Sushi and Dickens #iKvelled. The overarching theme of this article - which displays the conflict between old ways of doing things and adapting to a rapidly changing world where disruption does not cease - is pertinent across industries. It’s a personal transition too. As participants in the modern economy, we must constantly reflect on those aspects of our skills or training which remain relevant or are no longer. Wise and enjoyable read.

    “These two experiences encapsulate the dichotomous forces

    Sushi and Dickens #iKvelled. The overarching theme of this article - which displays the conflict between old ways of doing things and adapting to a rapidly changing world where disruption does not cease - is pertinent across industries. It’s a personal transition too. As participants in the modern economy, we must constantly reflect on those aspects of our skills or training which remain relevant or are no longer. Wise and enjoyable read.

    “These two experiences encapsulate the dichotomous forces at play not only in Japan today, but within each of us. Indeed, this tale of two sushi chefs is not just about Jiro-san and Sato-san. It is about you, and me. It is about our collective struggle to transform from the old to the new way of doing things. In a world of accelerating change, so many of us are finding ourselves unsuccessful at perfecting the formulas that have proven successful for the generations before us. It is only by letting go of this desire for perfection, this need for the ideal recipe for success that we can be liberated to make a new reality for ourselves. Indeed, nothing ever turns out as you intend it to… but occasionally you’ll end up with something even better than you could have imagined.”

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.” — Charles Dickens, 1859

  • A great piece from one of our earliest, most travelled, and thoughtful ProPickers!

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