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Zack Rosebrugh

Good evening.

Up, up, and away

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

Saving WeWork

WeWork is getting a lifeline. SoftBank Group and JP Morgan both have plans to bail out the struggling office-sharing company, CNBC reports. WeWork's board will review the proposals by the end of the week and opt for one or a combination.

SoftBank, JP Morgan to submit separate WeWork bailout proposals in coming days

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors are surprised that they can’t get enough customers in the door to keep the lights on.

What I never hear discussed in these talk about wavering SV companies is whether customers are buying their product. Have you looked at the price of a spot in a WeWork office? It’s astronomical for someone starting a small business and apparently the current price point isn’t even enough to cover the costs of goods (I.e. office space) much less turn a profit. Golden toilets.

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given WeWork close to $11 billion, the company might be beyond rescue. Hard to say whether SoftBank's throwing good money after bad. Right now, all WeWork has going for it is the company's existing contracts & what's left of its brand. The next month will be intriguing to watch.

Quartz at work

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

US-China tech diplomacy

Apple users in China: Beware. Privacy advocates worry about the US tech giant’s partnership with Tencent, which has close ties to Beijing, as they think it could share the IP addresses of internet users who try to visit blacklisted sites.

Apple’s data sharing with firms tied to the Chinese government may endanger dissidents

Have you visited a fraudulent site? If so, you likely got a warning from Google. But in China, users get warnings from Tencent, a co. close to the Chinese government. Thus, a service meant to protect users could threaten their freedom. Staying safe (and private) is hard.

The World in 50 Years

Apple's Indian revival

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Locked up in America

Stop the presses

Surprising discovery

Come back soon!

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Humanity is more important than money — it’s time for capitalism to get an upgrade

Humanity is more important than money — it’s time for capitalism to get an upgrade

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From Our Members

  • Fascinating big-picture piece from entrepreneur Andrew Yang about why we need to rethink the orientation of our economy. “What capitalism prioritizes, the world does more of,” he writes. “So how can we change capitalism so that it focuses on what humans really want and need?” He’s not talking about getting

    Fascinating big-picture piece from entrepreneur Andrew Yang about why we need to rethink the orientation of our economy. “What capitalism prioritizes, the world does more of,” he writes. “So how can we change capitalism so that it focuses on what humans really want and need?” He’s not talking about getting rid of capitalism, but changing it so it’s more aligned with what we really want out of it. Worth a read.

  • To expand on the author’s point about GDP, here is a simple example of why it can be so flawed.

    Let’s say 2 earthquake prone countries (Italy and India) need bridges.

    Italy builds high quality bridges. India builds low quality bridges.

    Earthquake! India’s bridges crumble. Italy’s don’t. India needs

    To expand on the author’s point about GDP, here is a simple example of why it can be so flawed.

    Let’s say 2 earthquake prone countries (Italy and India) need bridges.

    Italy builds high quality bridges. India builds low quality bridges.

    Earthquake! India’s bridges crumble. Italy’s don’t. India needs to rebuild those bridges.

    In this example, India’s GDP growth spikes that year while Italy’s does not. Even though spending money fixing a shoddy job is a waste of economic resources.

    Obviously, Italy did the right thing and there are lots of benefits of having built bridges to last. But those benefits don’t get counted as GDP.

  • Andrew Yang has an important story to tell. I started following his presidential campaign a few months ago based on his ideas around the need for Universal Basic Income (UBI) as one response to the loss of jobs to automation. President Obama spoke seriously about the idea just this week in South Africa

    Andrew Yang has an important story to tell. I started following his presidential campaign a few months ago based on his ideas around the need for Universal Basic Income (UBI) as one response to the loss of jobs to automation. President Obama spoke seriously about the idea just this week in South Africa. I’d like to see people participate in the economics of their data as one component of UBI. We have to start experimenting and learning.

  • In some countries such as Nepal, Bhutan & Denmark GDH (Gross Domestic Happiness) is more important than GDP. An idea that investing in the future of your citizens takes precedence over corporate interests.

  • Andrew Yang: In addition to GDP and job statistics, the government could adopt measurements like:

    Average physical fitness and mental health

    Quality of infrastructure

    Proportion of the elderly in quality care

    Marriage rates and success

    Deaths of despair; substance abuse...

  • 100%. Awesome article worth chewing on. Then figuring out ways to implement the (many) useful ideas, tenets, and government measurements of wellbeing.

    A voluminous task no doubt. Though I think the prescription is needed. Preserving the economic and social dynamism of the United States, which we’ve

    100%. Awesome article worth chewing on. Then figuring out ways to implement the (many) useful ideas, tenets, and government measurements of wellbeing.

    A voluminous task no doubt. Though I think the prescription is needed. Preserving the economic and social dynamism of the United States, which we’ve come to know and enjoy, over the long term is the project of our generation.

    “In the US, and in much of the developed world, our current form of capitalism is failing to produce an increasing standard of living for most of its citizens. It’s time for an upgrade. Adam Smith, the Scottish economist who wrote The Wealth of Nations in 1776, is often regarded as the father of modern capitalism. His ideas — that the “invisible hand” guides the market; that a division of labor exists and should exist; and that self-interest and competition lead to wealth creation — are so deeply internalized that most of us take them for granted.”

    “Human capitalism would have a few core tenets:

    1. Humanity is more important than money.

    2. The unit of an economy is each person, not each dollar.

    3. Markets exist to serve our common goals and values.

    In addition to GDP and job statistics, the government could adopt measurements like:

    Average physical fitness and mental health

    Quality of infrastructure

    Proportion of the elderly in quality care

    Marriage rates and success

    Deaths of despair; substance abuse

    Global temperature variance and sea levels

    Re-acclimation of incarcerated individuals and rates of criminality

    Artistic and cultural vibrancy

    Dynamism and mobility

    Social and economic equity

    Civic engagement

    Cybersecurity

    Responsiveness and evolution of government”

  • What this article seems to miss out on, is that the systems of government and social structures of most western democracies were set up and designed entirely so that a few people could make more money. Humanity was never a consideration. School curriculums were designed to create employees, not humans

    What this article seems to miss out on, is that the systems of government and social structures of most western democracies were set up and designed entirely so that a few people could make more money. Humanity was never a consideration. School curriculums were designed to create employees, not humans. Hospitals focus on getting you back to work, not being fulfilled. What nature provided for free was destroyed and replaced with what could be charged for. Of course there were narratives of ‘humanity’ that made us all believe that was a consideration. But the true test is the systems created and the actions taken (not the stories told -there speaks the true marketer in me). The systems are so deep they will be difficult to change. Our democracy is structured by these same mechanisms and so changing the system is unlikely to happen. Especially if data and automation continues to hard wire these systems, further reducing the possibility of humanity’s intervention.

  • Yang’s recommendations for s broader perspective make sense. Politically, I think this could be a challenge, as the individualism that has shaped much of the US culture seems to conflict with some o these goals. It’s good to see thinking that takes a broader view of the system getting discussion, as

    Yang’s recommendations for s broader perspective make sense. Politically, I think this could be a challenge, as the individualism that has shaped much of the US culture seems to conflict with some o these goals. It’s good to see thinking that takes a broader view of the system getting discussion, as that is the essential issue here: what kind of world or country do we want to live in? Alignment on questions like this seems to be a prerequisite to durable action and impact. And, as noted in the piece and comments, measurement creates distractions, both due to metric flaws (e.g., GDP) and the inability to measure some important things well.

    In addition to the issues highlighted in the piece, this discussion resonates with a review (from the Economist; will post as a pick) of Jeffrey Pfeffer’s new book about the negative effects of work pressure and stress on our society. The ability to match labor to needs and adjust quickly has benefits for companies, but has costs for both individual and societies.

  • Love this article. We need to re-evaluate what we reward.

  • From a social science point of view, it would seem that in the earliest societies, this "social credit" system was automatically implemented just from innate human nature and ethics; if you do good things, you become admirable and people will value you for that. But what Yang's getting at, in my view

    From a social science point of view, it would seem that in the earliest societies, this "social credit" system was automatically implemented just from innate human nature and ethics; if you do good things, you become admirable and people will value you for that. But what Yang's getting at, in my view, has been long overdue. The administrative heads of both corporations and governments often get so introspective at the "big" issues they're trying to solve that they become blind to real problems faced by people in their own communities. Drawing from this, I find it highly unlikely, or at least very time-consuming, to coordinate a social credit system nationwide before the US undergoes major political upheaval. Nonetheless, the expansion and awareness of the DSC system in individual communities is vital.

  • Digital social credit. Credit-based economy.

  • “Human capitalism would have a few core tenets:

    1. Humanity is more important than money.

    2. The unit of an economy is each person, not each dollar.

    3. Markets exist to serve our common goals and values.”

    Bravo. This is a great and provocative piece that really shouldn’t be provocative at all.

  • Andrew Yang’s take on human capitalism intertwines how we define capitalism and socialism. He isn’t touting radical changes, but in the construction of a parallel economy.

    Andrew Yang is a Presidential candidate for the 2020 election and although he isn’t a politician, he seems to understand technology

    Andrew Yang’s take on human capitalism intertwines how we define capitalism and socialism. He isn’t touting radical changes, but in the construction of a parallel economy.

    Andrew Yang is a Presidential candidate for the 2020 election and although he isn’t a politician, he seems to understand technology and the job market. As President Trump has proved, political outsiders have a chance.

  • Finally, someone is talking some sense in this world.

  • Thank you. UTOPIANCAPITALIST DOT COM

  • This seems like an incredible idea.

  • To me, it seems he is viewing the market as people buy what the market produces and not that the market produces what the people demand. The main incentive of a company is to obtain customers and have returning customers. Pull people that have paid off of a plane to increase profit, then you will not

    To me, it seems he is viewing the market as people buy what the market produces and not that the market produces what the people demand. The main incentive of a company is to obtain customers and have returning customers. Pull people that have paid off of a plane to increase profit, then you will not have an airline for very long. There is also an incentive to have new and evolving products when you have vigorous competition. Government is what creates stagnation in evolving industries.

  • I for one want to strive for my own accomplishments and happiness. I think the government should be smaller. Everything in this article will most likely come to fruition in time naturally

  • Hi