The plane carrying U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry descends over Doha, Qatar on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Qatar is Kerry's final destination on his first official overseas trip as secretary of state.

Not even the end of Ramadan and the Eid al-Fitr holiday helped fill Qatari hotels

57%

Five hotels in Doha, which are usually packed this time of the year because of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, have an average occupancy rate of only 57%.

Published   |  Photo by AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, Pool
The plane carrying U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry descends over Doha, Qatar on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Qatar is Kerry's final destination on his first official overseas trip as secretary of state.
57%

Though dates vary, the Eid al-Fitr holiday started on Sunday (June 25) and ended on Tuesday (June 27), marking the end of Ramadan.

The plane carrying U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry descends over Doha, Qatar on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Qatar is Kerry's final destination on his first official overseas trip as secretary of state.
57%

Almost half of tourists in Qatar come from five Gulf countries. But since early June, four of those countries cut ties with Qatar.

The plane carrying U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry descends over Doha, Qatar on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Qatar is Kerry's final destination on his first official overseas trip as secretary of state.
57%

The United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and Egypt started the diplomatic row. Several other nations followed them, also blocking Qatar.

The plane carrying U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry descends over Doha, Qatar on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Qatar is Kerry's final destination on his first official overseas trip as secretary of state.
57%

The blockade is a blow for tourism, which makes up 4.1% of Qatar’s GDP. Besides empty hotels, the strained relations are also hitting airports.

The plane carrying U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry descends over Doha, Qatar on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Qatar is Kerry's final destination on his first official overseas trip as secretary of state.
57%

Qatar’s Hamad International Airport is expected to lose 27,000 passengers per day in early July compared to the same period last year.

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