A worker checks his truck at PT Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia's factory in Cibitung, Indonesia's West Java province, February 24, 2011. The Australian-based bottler and distributor for Coca Cola across Oceania had invested AUD$100 million ($101 million) in Indonesia over three years, doubling the company's investment in the country, Business Service Director Bruce Waterfield said during a media tour at the factory on Thursday.

Coca-Cola is so desperate to find a sugar alternative, it’s offering a huge reward

$1 m

Coca-Cola announced a $1 million prize to find a natural and safe low- or no-calorie compound that has the same sensation as sugar when mixed into drinks and foods.

Published   |  Photo by Reuters/Beawiharta
A worker checks his truck at PT Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia's factory in Cibitung, Indonesia's West Java province, February 24, 2011. The Australian-based bottler and distributor for Coca Cola across Oceania had invested AUD$100 million ($101 million) in Indonesia over three years, doubling the company's investment in the country, Business Service Director Bruce Waterfield said during a media tour at the factory on Thursday.
$1 m

Scientists have already found natural sources for sweetness—stevia leaves are about 300 times sweeter than sugar, but don’t mimic its other properties: structure, texture, and moisture control.

A worker checks his truck at PT Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia's factory in Cibitung, Indonesia's West Java province, February 24, 2011. The Australian-based bottler and distributor for Coca Cola across Oceania had invested AUD$100 million ($101 million) in Indonesia over three years, doubling the company's investment in the country, Business Service Director Bruce Waterfield said during a media tour at the factory on Thursday.
$1 m

The fact that a multi-billion dollar company is resorting to a public contest to find a sugar substitute for its flagship products says a lot about the state of soft drinks in America.

A worker checks his truck at PT Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia's factory in Cibitung, Indonesia's West Java province, February 24, 2011. The Australian-based bottler and distributor for Coca Cola across Oceania had invested AUD$100 million ($101 million) in Indonesia over three years, doubling the company's investment in the country, Business Service Director Bruce Waterfield said during a media tour at the factory on Thursday.
$1 m

Americans drink 19% less soda today than they did 15 years ago. A big reason for the decline is based on consumer health concerns.

A worker checks his truck at PT Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia's factory in Cibitung, Indonesia's West Java province, February 24, 2011. The Australian-based bottler and distributor for Coca Cola across Oceania had invested AUD$100 million ($101 million) in Indonesia over three years, doubling the company's investment in the country, Business Service Director Bruce Waterfield said during a media tour at the factory on Thursday.
$1 m

A worker checks his truck at PT Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia's factory in Cibitung, Indonesia's West Java province, February 24, 2011. The Australian-based bottler and distributor for Coca Cola across Oceania had invested AUD$100 million ($101 million) in Indonesia over three years, doubling the company's investment in the country, Business Service Director Bruce Waterfield said during a media tour at the factory on Thursday.
$1 m

Consumers worried about sugar’s link to chronic maladies are shifting to healthier beverages like bottled waters and herbal teas. They are also voting in favor of soda taxes in cities across America.

A worker checks his truck at PT Coca-Cola Amatil Indonesia's factory in Cibitung, Indonesia's West Java province, February 24, 2011. The Australian-based bottler and distributor for Coca Cola across Oceania had invested AUD$100 million ($101 million) in Indonesia over three years, doubling the company's investment in the country, Business Service Director Bruce Waterfield said during a media tour at the factory on Thursday.
$1 m

Sugar is on the decline in other countries as well. Coca-Cola and Pepsi recently announced they would cap the sugar in drinks in Singapore, one of the first Asian countries to limit sugary beverages.

Published

Check out more stories below—and please take a quick three-minute survey to help us improve.

Share this story

home our picks popular latest obsessions search