The vineyards of Lavaux are pictured overlooking Lake Leman after an overnight snowfall in Riex near Vevey

Winemakers are having their worst year since 1961

246.7 million hecto-liters

The world’s wine output in 2017 is expected to fall to its lowest point in more than fifty years, due primarily to harsh weather in Europe that damaged vineyards.

Published   |  Photo by Reuters//Denis Balibous
The vineyards of Lavaux are pictured overlooking Lake Leman after an overnight snowfall in Riex near Vevey
246.7 million hecto-liters

The International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) expects output to fall 8% in 2017, due to sharp declines in the world’s three biggest wine producers—France, Italy, and Spain.

The vineyards of Lavaux are pictured overlooking Lake Leman after an overnight snowfall in Riex near Vevey
246.7 million hecto-liters

Italy’s production is expected to fall 23% to 39.3 million hectolitres, France’s to fall 19% percent to 36.7 million, and Spain’s to fall 15% percent to 33.5 million, due to harsh weather conditions.

The vineyards of Lavaux are pictured overlooking Lake Leman after an overnight snowfall in Riex near Vevey
246.7 million hecto-liters

Climate change is expected to increasingly wreak havoc on the sensitive microclimates that produce many of the world’s finest wines, although some regions will benefit from higher temperatures.

The vineyards of Lavaux are pictured overlooking Lake Leman after an overnight snowfall in Riex near Vevey
246.7 million hecto-liters

The OIV expects US wine production to fall only 1% to 23.3 million hectolitres. Australia and Argentina will post significant increases.

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