A photo illustration shows the Uber app on a mobile telephone, as it is held up for a posed photograph, with London Taxis in the background, in London

The key number to understand the UK’s decision to treat Uber drivers as workers, not contractors

80%

A court in London has upheld a ruling that Uber drivers are employees, not contractors—in part because they are punished if they fail to accept at least 80% of ride requests.

Published   |  Photo by Reuters/Simon Dawson
A photo illustration shows the Uber app on a mobile telephone, as it is held up for a posed photograph, with London Taxis in the background, in London
80%

Last year two Uber drivers sued the ride-hailing firm to obtain status as employees (with regular breaks, paid vacations, and minimum wage) instead of independent contractors.

A photo illustration shows the Uber app on a mobile telephone, as it is held up for a posed photograph, with London Taxis in the background, in London
80%

Uber argued that its drivers are free to do things like control their schedule. It contested the 80% claim, though that figure was cited in the judge’s decision.

A photo illustration shows the Uber app on a mobile telephone, as it is held up for a posed photograph, with London Taxis in the background, in London
80%

The UK tribunal ruled (and upheld the decision on Friday) that Uber drivers were under strict instructions on how to behave, and that Uber controls the prices they charge, and punishes them for denying too many trips.

Published

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