Passengers travel on the London Underground, July 8, 2005.

South London’s Kennington district sank 1 centimeter in a year

1 cm

The London Underground has caused an entire neighborhood to sink 1 centimeter over the past year, due to an extension of the system’s Northern line.

Published   |  Photo by Reuters/Mike Finn-Kelcey
Passengers travel on the London Underground, July 8, 2005.
1 cm

European weather satellite Sentinel-1 made the surprising discovery using a special radar that can detect tiny geometric shifts in the Earth’s surface.

Passengers travel on the London Underground, July 8, 2005.
1 cm
esri-kennington-uplift-subsidence

ESRI/Geomatic Ventures Limited

Passengers travel on the London Underground, July 8, 2005.
1 cm

Geomatic Ventures says the most likely reason for Kennington’s subsidence is the sinking of shaft—the digging of a vertical tunnel—completed last November.

Passengers travel on the London Underground, July 8, 2005.
1 cm

Though the image looks dramatic, London’s infrastructure is able to deal with a whole area sinking just a little. But troubles can occur when some parts go deeper and others don’t.

Passengers travel on the London Underground, July 8, 2005.
1 cm

The most surprising find: A village by the name of Willand, in the region of Devon, is rising more than 2 cm per year. So far, that’s gone unexplained.

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