Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange September 3, 2013. U.S. stocks advanced on Tuesday after U.S. President Barack Obama decided to seek congressional authorization before taking military action against Syria, a move that was likely to shelve any strike for at least several days. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Fewer tech startups are going public in the US, but they are making more money

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Seven venture-backed tech companies went public in the US in the first quarter of 2017, down from a peak of 39 in the first quarter of 2014.

Published   |  Photo by Reuters/Brendan McDermid
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange September 3, 2013. U.S. stocks advanced on Tuesday after U.S. President Barack Obama decided to seek congressional authorization before taking military action against Syria, a move that was likely to shelve any strike for at least several days. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Quarterly number of US venture-backed IPOs of tech startup

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange September 3, 2013. U.S. stocks advanced on Tuesday after U.S. President Barack Obama decided to seek congressional authorization before taking military action against Syria, a move that was likely to shelve any strike for at least several days. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Funds raised in US venture-backed IPOs of tech startup

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange September 3, 2013. U.S. stocks advanced on Tuesday after U.S. President Barack Obama decided to seek congressional authorization before taking military action against Syria, a move that was likely to shelve any strike for at least several days. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Though there were fewer IPOs, venture-backed tech startups raised $4 billion.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange September 3, 2013. U.S. stocks advanced on Tuesday after U.S. President Barack Obama decided to seek congressional authorization before taking military action against Syria, a move that was likely to shelve any strike for at least several days. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Then came software companies MuleSoft, with $221 million, and Alteryx, with $126 million.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange September 3, 2013. U.S. stocks advanced on Tuesday after U.S. President Barack Obama decided to seek congressional authorization before taking military action against Syria, a move that was likely to shelve any strike for at least several days. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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That was mostly thanks to Snap, which garnered the largest share of the pile bringing in $3.4 billion.

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