Skip to navigationSkip to content
SENSORY OVERLOAD

Inside India’s coal country

The Dipka Extension mine near Hardi Bazar in Korba, Chhattisgarh, India.
Harsha Vadlamani for Quartz
The Dipka Extension mine near Hardi Bazar in Korba, Chhattisgarh, India.
  • Akshat Rathi
By Akshat Rathi

Senior reporter

Published Last updated on

In Korba, coal is everywhere—even in the air. 

We arrived in the city by train in mid-September, which is typically close to the end of the monsoon season in this part of the Indian state of Chhattisgarh. But the deluge hadn’t abated yet. Instead, we were warned that rainfall had picked up in recent weeks. 

Heavy rain should have precipitated the pollution in the air—the tiny particles of dust, coal, and organic matter created by extracting coal from open-to-air mines or produced when coal is burned in inefficient power plants. But the sulfurous, mildly irritating smell was inescapable.

Enrich your perspective. Embolden your work. Become a Quartz member.

Your membership supports a team of global Quartz journalists reporting on the forces shaping our world. We make sense of accelerating change and help you get ahead of it with business news for the next era, not just the next hour. Subscribe to Quartz today.

Membership includes:

こちらは英語版への登録ページです。
Quartz Japanへの登録をご希望の方はこちらから。