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On Sunday (March 20), thousands of Tibetans arrived at the courtyard of the Tsuglagkhang Temple in the northern Indian town of Dharamsala to vote for a new political leader for the next five years.

This was the second election since the 14th Dalai Lama stepped down as head of the government-in-exile. In 2011, the Dalai Lama relinquished his post to focus on his role as the spiritual leader for Tibetans. On Sunday, some 80,000 exiled Tibetans cast their vote from across the world.

For decades, many Tibetans have been living outside of their homeland, especially in India, after a failed uprising against the Chinese government, which has been ruling the region since 1951. The Central Tibetan Administration, or the Tibetan government-in-exile—based in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh—was established after the Dalai Lama fled to India in 1951.

The polling took place at 85 locations around the world. Voters had to choose 45 members to the parliament-in-exile, including a prime minister, from a total of 94 candidates. The results will be declared on April 27.

China has always maintained that Tibet has been a part of its territory since the mid-13th century. “We never recognise this so-called government-in-exile,” a spokesperson for the Chinese foreign ministry said on March 17. “We hope that all countries in this world, especially those that want to maintain friendly relations with China, will not provide facilities or venues for any anti-China, separatist activities by the so-called Tibet independence forces.”

Here is a collection of pictures from the election in Dharamsala.

Reuters/Adnan Abidi
A Tibetan exile gets her finger inked before casting her vote at a polling booth in Dharamsala.
AP Photo /Ashwini Bhatia
Penpa Tsering, one of the two candidates contesting the prime ministerial election, casts his vote.
AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal
Exiled Tibetan nuns await their turn to vote for the next prime minister and parliamentarians.
AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal
Exiled Tibetans line up to cast their vote.
Reuters/Adnan Abidi
A child stands next to her father and others holding their identity cards to cast their votes.
AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal
A woman marks her choice on a ballot paper before voting.
AP Photo /Ashwini Bhatia
A monk holds his Green Book, a document Tibetans must carry in order to vote.
AP Photo /Ashwini Bhatia
Lobsang Sangay, the incumbent prime minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile, speaks to the media in Dharamsala after voting.
Reuters/Adnan Abidi
Tibetan exiles react as they cast their votes at a polling booth in Dharamsala, India.
AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal
A Tibetan election official hands over ballot papers showing pictures of the prime ministerial candidates to a voter.
AP Photo /Ashwini Bhatia
An elderly monk looks at the ballot papers as he prepares to cast his vote.
Reuters/Adnan Abidi
A woman is helped by his husband to mark her ballot paper.
Reuters/Adnan Abidi
Monks queue up to cast their vote.
Reuters/Adnan Abidi
Monks cast their vote.
REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
A polling booth.
Reuters/Adnan Abidi
A nun on her way to a polling booth.
Reuters/Adnan Abidi
Polling officers help a Tibetan monk at a polling booth.