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Matt Wallaert

Matt Wallaert

Chief Behavioral Officer at Clover Health
695 Following102.4k Followers
  • The first debate did a nice job of confirming this. Nobody dominated. The major candidates spoke for roughly the same amount of time. They expressed differentiated viewpoints. And there is something to like and dislike about each candidate. All that combined shows why it isn’t as simple as just choice overload.

  • If this $500B was instead viewed as consumer debt (spending what you didn’t earn), might we be somewhat less sanguine about this? Intergenerational finance is important in both directions, but as consumer debt continues its unchecked rise, what matters is that as a society we continue to overspend. If young people are contributing to that, more the pity.

  • Driving is like swimming: a skill worth learning for the situations when you need it. Should everyone own a car? Of course not. But driving should be separated from that.

  • You won’t call it financial planning. Instead, we will automate your spending on things you don’t care about and give you control on what you do. The “payment” will be simple leadgen.

  • This is bigger than cars; look at TVs and the constant wavering back and forth from smart to dumb.

    At stake is the common bundling/unbundling issue. A phone is a screen/cpu/connectivity bundle (compare to a laptop, for example, which is just a screen/cpu bundle and thus gets less use). The question has always been: do we need more than one CPU? It seemed like we were going single device for awhile (you will stream from your phone or computer to a dumb screen), then the cloud and ubiquitous connectivity

    This is bigger than cars; look at TVs and the constant wavering back and forth from smart to dumb.

    At stake is the common bundling/unbundling issue. A phone is a screen/cpu/connectivity bundle (compare to a laptop, for example, which is just a screen/cpu bundle and thus gets less use). The question has always been: do we need more than one CPU? It seemed like we were going single device for awhile (you will stream from your phone or computer to a dumb screen), then the cloud and ubiquitous connectivity made us move away from it.

    All things being equal, multiple smart objects is better. But all things aren’t equal. Each new object has to mesh in terms of usability, costs go up, and there are simple logistical concerns as well. This is why Apple still exists - they made a closed ecosystem that avoids those problems.

    But open always wins in the end.

  • I like that dad has the kids. But everything else is actually an ode to a bad workplace that should be avoided.

  • Ultimately, having someone to call bullshit on your behavior is key. Do you think Biden, who really has made great strides on his approach to gender issues, had an emotionally close other who could call bullshit?

  • The important part of this story: “You’re swapping one thoughtless habit for another thoughtless habit.” The replacement just happens to save lives. That is behavioral science at work and the kind of thoughtful design that will help us take the next step toward a better world.

  • What if you didn’t have to apply? Establish a set of base criteria, then randomly send eligible students a note that they have a slot if they want it. They can always turn it down if the don’t want to go and no ethnic group can possibly object to offering slots to qualified students. And you remove the strong inhibiting pressure that is knowing and applying and feeling it is “for you”.

  • I like and respect @karaswisher but this headline is ridiculous. 97% of the land mass of America is rural and 20% of the population lives there. It isn’t just “easier” for urban dwellers; tech companies actively cater to them. Even autonomous driving is focused on the urban market, instead of relieving the many hours of driving that rural Americans spend just to get basics like groceries.

    To call them quaint is the worst kind of snobbery. That’s like saying people who don’t have broadband are choosing

    I like and respect @karaswisher but this headline is ridiculous. 97% of the land mass of America is rural and 20% of the population lives there. It isn’t just “easier” for urban dwellers; tech companies actively cater to them. Even autonomous driving is focused on the urban market, instead of relieving the many hours of driving that rural Americans spend just to get basics like groceries.

    To call them quaint is the worst kind of snobbery. That’s like saying people who don’t have broadband are choosing slow internet, as opposed to dealing with access issues. If Kara and the NYT want to expedite the transition off car ownership, perhaps they could advocate for the infrastructure and technology investments that would unlock it for 20% of people?

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