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Jim Anderson

Jim Anderson

CEO at SocialFlow
6 Following56.7k Followers
  • The “we’re at war” footing is understandable, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see him soften the language and tone. “War” implies you have a specific enemy to fight, and that’s not the case here. Facebook faces concerns from regulators, privacy advocates, advertisers, the media, and end users—each with

    The “we’re at war” footing is understandable, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see him soften the language and tone. “War” implies you have a specific enemy to fight, and that’s not the case here. Facebook faces concerns from regulators, privacy advocates, advertisers, the media, and end users—each with their own criticisms, both fair and unfair. It’s going to take some diplomacy and compromise for Facebook to come out of this period the way it wants to.

  • What strikes me most is that I am comment #19, and every single one of the posts before me is negative—some of them dripping with visceral anger. Lack of Trust + Anger is Facebook’s biggest challenge moving forward. They created this situation, and now they have to see if they can fix, or at least improve, it.

  • This article is spot on, but let’s take it one step further: Imagine I have a $50 bill, a stock certificate for one share of Twenty-First Century Fox (closed at $47.93 today), and $50 worth of arcade tokens.

    Each is an instrument that is valued at or around $50. Yet there are massive differences in

    This article is spot on, but let’s take it one step further: Imagine I have a $50 bill, a stock certificate for one share of Twenty-First Century Fox (closed at $47.93 today), and $50 worth of arcade tokens.

    Each is an instrument that is valued at or around $50. Yet there are massive differences in how and where the instruments can be transacted, and only one of them is likely to work if I try to buy $50 worth of groceries. But if I hold on to all of them for five years, the purchasing power of the $50 bill will likely have deflated by perhaps 10%; the stock certificate will likely have appreciated, perhaps by a lot; and the arcade tokens will almost certainly be worthless.

    Each of the three examples can apply to the world of blockchain-powered tokens as well. Cryptocurrencies, security tokens, and utility tokens each incorporate blockchain, but they are just as different as the examples cited above.

    Blockchain sits at the intersection of economic theory and cryptography—not the most accessible topics in the world. Understanding and adoption are going to take a while.

  • We’ll no doubt gravitate to the extreme examples of “helicopter parents” doing nonsensical things, but in general this seems like a nice, family-friendly trend. If an employee wants his or her parents to see where they work, I say more power to them...

  • The fact that it was two places like New York (where I live) and DC seems feels a bit disappointing. To be clear, Amazon has every right to expand wherever it chooses... But when you go through a year+ process with 238 applicants and then pick two cities that would have been in anyone’s “five most obvious

    The fact that it was two places like New York (where I live) and DC seems feels a bit disappointing. To be clear, Amazon has every right to expand wherever it chooses... But when you go through a year+ process with 238 applicants and then pick two cities that would have been in anyone’s “five most obvious choices” list, it does invite questions about the authenticity of the process. (Google “Scott Galloway HQ2 con” for one particularly scathing indictment.)

  • I’ve posted a few things on Medium, and love the platform’s ease of use and simple elegance. But from a consumer perspective they face the same problem as everyone else who wants to sell subscriptions: share of wallet. How many monthly subscriptions can a consumer possibly have? They end up competing

    I’ve posted a few things on Medium, and love the platform’s ease of use and simple elegance. But from a consumer perspective they face the same problem as everyone else who wants to sell subscriptions: share of wallet. How many monthly subscriptions can a consumer possibly have? They end up competing for dollars with subscription products ranging from the New York Times to The Atlantic to Netflix to Hulu. I hope they get enough to hit profitability, but there’s no doubt it’s an uphill climb.

  • Problems with metrics surely didn’t help matters, but I doubt the numbers caused many publishers to aggressively pursue video: it was the promise, not the past, driving the decisions. And don’t forget that every outlet that sells advertising seemingly wants to go after the holy grail of ”TV dollars”

    Problems with metrics surely didn’t help matters, but I doubt the numbers caused many publishers to aggressively pursue video: it was the promise, not the past, driving the decisions. And don’t forget that every outlet that sells advertising seemingly wants to go after the holy grail of ”TV dollars”; ad sales groups would have been involved in discussions related to areas of investment / areas of cuts.

    It’s interesting that one thing absent from this discussion is Facebook Live. There was considerable enthusiasm for that for a short period of time until people realized that low-production-value iPhone videos were usually, well, bad. Chewbacca Mom transcended that... but not much else (other than disasters and tragedies, which by their nature are typically captured rather than produced).

  • Theirs is not a journey for the faint of heart, and I give Civil a lot of credit for staking out a position and pursuing it. Whether it will work: well, as Daniel Iles says, who knows? That’s a journey every new venture has to take. Disclosure: at SocialFlow we have our own tokenized approach; it’s very

    Theirs is not a journey for the faint of heart, and I give Civil a lot of credit for staking out a position and pursuing it. Whether it will work: well, as Daniel Iles says, who knows? That’s a journey every new venture has to take. Disclosure: at SocialFlow we have our own tokenized approach; it’s very different than Civil, but is focused on solving the problems of many of the media companies mentioned in this article (most of which are SocialFlow customers). And in addition to Civil and SocialFlow, Invisibly has its own approach. So does the Brave browser and its Basic Attention Token. And Po.et. And the Spot Protocol out of Australia. The number of smart people trying to solve problems in the media ecosystem, all in their own way, is an indicator that there’s a real need and opportunity here. [Correction, made 10/11/18: it’s Matthew Iles, not Daniel.]

  • He was there “in a personal capacity on a personal day,” but sitting behind Judge Kavanaugh he was still Facebook’s VP of public policy.

    There are instances where it is really hard to separate your personal views from your career (see: Kaepernick, Colin), and it’s been clearly illustrated that companies

    He was there “in a personal capacity on a personal day,” but sitting behind Judge Kavanaugh he was still Facebook’s VP of public policy.

    There are instances where it is really hard to separate your personal views from your career (see: Kaepernick, Colin), and it’s been clearly illustrated that companies have no obligation to support an employee’s free speech.

    In many ways this Facebook situation is reminiscent of Microsoft in the early 2000s: everything they do is under extraordinary scrutiny, and they don’t get the benefit of the doubt. The head of policy should be quite aware of the optics.

  • If you trust Apple, this is a smart move, done in a way to protect privacy, that gives them one more tool to combat fraud. If you don’t trust Apple, it’s a potential Trojan horse. I tend to believe that Apple is playing above-board here, if for no other reason than they’ve invested a lot of brand equity

    If you trust Apple, this is a smart move, done in a way to protect privacy, that gives them one more tool to combat fraud. If you don’t trust Apple, it’s a potential Trojan horse. I tend to believe that Apple is playing above-board here, if for no other reason than they’ve invested a lot of brand equity in a position that supports privacy. Why risk that?