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hugh duthie

hugh duthie

partner at walk the dog research
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  • The arrogance cum idiocy of Gillette is hard to fathom. To miss the facial hair sea change is a fail of truly epic proportions. I mean, think about it, this is not a complicated, fad driven, category like color cosmetics where you could miss a trend in a split second. Gillette has had a simple task

    The arrogance cum idiocy of Gillette is hard to fathom. To miss the facial hair sea change is a fail of truly epic proportions. I mean, think about it, this is not a complicated, fad driven, category like color cosmetics where you could miss a trend in a split second. Gillette has had a simple task - stay abreast of men’s facial hair grooming. The “beard thing” has been increasing slowly but surely, year on year since the hipster goatee debuted in the mid 90s. For a p&g exec to speak of men with facial hair as “not judged negatively” in 2019 is indicative of their monumental stupidity

    Then, to have been blindsided by the Dollar Shave Club et al, is almost as unforgiveable. Ask any man what has given him sticker shock in life and he will mention the first time he had to buy Gillette razor blades. This is a category that was basically hollering for price disruption. Thank goodness it arrived.

  • The ultimate corporate conundrum- your core business is fundamentally detrimental to the environment. I wouldn’t call this greenwashing, it is a very positive first step

    It is a reminder, that biz and first class seats, by far. And that DOES come back to most airlines’ myopic and short term worldview

    The ultimate corporate conundrum- your core business is fundamentally detrimental to the environment. I wouldn’t call this greenwashing, it is a very positive first step

    It is a reminder, that biz and first class seats, by far. And that DOES come back to most airlines’ myopic and short term worldview I.e. that economy class should be as minimally tolderable as possible. If they actually made economy comfortable, I have no doubt people would trade down - with far higher fuel efficiencies as the result

    Kudos to KLM. This would certainly never come from any one of our carriers

  • Yet another example of how “disruptive” tech companies are “destructive” and somewhat with conscience - to a degree that is highly disturbing. I wish I could operate in so unregulated and unfettered way.

  • Yet another example of the beyond dark side of the digital economy. Even the term “moderation” smacks of Orwellian euphemism. I wonder what would happen if Facebook were not allowed to outsource this horrific task?

  • In my opinion the book publishing industry might take a lead out of this and create more “need states” or “reading occasions”. How about Plane Reads or Subway Reads? Or Anti-anxiety Reads or Recharge Reads?

  • How ironic that it might a lawsuit by men that makes progress for women in the workplace.

  • With the American -US Airways merger we essentially got down to 3 legacy carriers with the vast majority of market share. Today there is less comfort and service, in any measure a real human being would care about, and far higher ticket prices. Nothing like this could ever happen jn the world of mobile telephony, now could it?

  • At some point in recent history, there was a brief shining moment when a Passengers’ Bill of Rights was mooted. If memory serves me correctly it was NY Senator Chick Schumer who was its chief shill, entirely appropriately given the fact that two of the nation’s worst airports, JFK snd LGA, sit squarely

    At some point in recent history, there was a brief shining moment when a Passengers’ Bill of Rights was mooted. If memory serves me correctly it was NY Senator Chick Schumer who was its chief shill, entirely appropriately given the fact that two of the nation’s worst airports, JFK snd LGA, sit squarely in his home turf and are probably responsible for trammeling more than their fair share of passengers’ rights - if of course we had any.

    Interestingly, this agitation and political posturing (most of which went nowhere) happened against a backdrop of an infamously unprofitable industry. Perhaps Chuck Shumer and posse felt we were at risk not just of roasting on infernal summer tarmac, but of planes falling right out of the sky

    Flash forward 5 years and the domestic tri-opoly have managed the industry into profitability with full planes and whiz bang apps, like Delta’s, that make it super easy to transact, and even easier and more scientific for the airlines to determine which amenity will be the least intrusive to remove, and how they can subdivide economy into yet one more zone.

    Any company that places me in a seat that no longer reclines, like an exit row seat in a place called Basic Economy, and makes me board in a small herd of fellow Zone 5s, should expect me to be resentful and seething. And if they should then go further, perhaps, say killing my beloved pet they have also surcharged me to bring along, well, they should definitely be prepared for some air rage.

    If we needed a Passengers’ Bill of Rights back then, when we initially accepted that any and all vestiges of glamour were gone from air travel, we need that Passengers’ Bill of Rights even more today.

    If there’s anything worse, it turns out, than a tired and nearly broke legacy carrier, it’s that same carrier suddenly flush with cash. Profits have had little impact on the thing that should matter the most after safety - the inflight passenger experience. Profits have simply enabled a more streamlined and scientific approach to eradicating passenger comfort.

    And where is the outrage of politicians like Chuck Schumer today? Nonexistant. Vanished, like an actual meal in economy and the notion that travel with a suitcase is the norm not a privilege. Somehow I suspect they got to Schumer. Maybe they have created a secret Zone X, hidden in plain sight in the main cabin, where seats recline, the drinks are free and the wifi consistently works - an unmarked zone with invisible, plentiful amenities. That’s where I expect to find our senators and congressmen. American, Delta and United haven’t improved one little bit. They have just become cleverer about treating most of us like crap.

  • This is the ultimate conundrum. The price of a drug versus the value of a human life with the cost of investing in the R & D to fill the pipeline also thrown in the mix. This, it seems to me, is where morality meets the road in 2019. And yet our politicians are still stuck on Roe v Wade.

    I instinctively

    This is the ultimate conundrum. The price of a drug versus the value of a human life with the cost of investing in the R & D to fill the pipeline also thrown in the mix. This, it seems to me, is where morality meets the road in 2019. And yet our politicians are still stuck on Roe v Wade.

    I instinctively choose life (not to be confused with “Life”) but I lack the economic argument.