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john carver

john carver

  • Another piece of hopeless romanticization of something that was never made to last. The Founding Fathers intended the Constitution to be elastic, being able to accommodate the changes that any nation would inevitably undergo over time. And, while it is true that the landscape of American politics had

    Another piece of hopeless romanticization of something that was never made to last. The Founding Fathers intended the Constitution to be elastic, being able to accommodate the changes that any nation would inevitably undergo over time. And, while it is true that the landscape of American politics had changed drastically even in the past half century, to say that those changes are indicative of imminent doom is just worry mongering. The cycle is the same, every four years, everyone gets all worked up, all of our issues come to a head, and we pick the person most suited to handle those issues, or, the one we THINK is more able. It's harder to focus on local politics because the issues generally aren't as grand in a small town - do we repave Old Mill Road, or when is the PTA banquet vs where do our tax dollars go, or do we go to war, or do such and such people deserve a voice in our forums. To think that every zip code would have a separate social policy is th very choas that our founders sought to avoid, and indeed, that overly independent, "I'll do as I please regardless of how the nation I call myself a member of sees the matter" attitude that so many small towns tried to enforce during the Jim Crow era is exactly what nationalized politics prevents, in most cases.

    I don't know if we'll ever see the end of small politics, there are too many different tribes and creeds and small matters that affect us all differently and directly in our own little areas of this great land, which is exactly what makes America, well, America, but I also fail to see how having a national stance on the more far reaching issues that touch us all, like segregation or gay rights, represents the fall of Western Democracy.

  • I meditate at work, for at least ten minutes a day. it's probably the only thing that keeps me sane during the work day. I'm sure my pace slows a bit, and I'm also sure I'm a bit more distant during and immediately after my meditation while I recenter in the real world, but my overall stress diminishes

    I meditate at work, for at least ten minutes a day. it's probably the only thing that keeps me sane during the work day. I'm sure my pace slows a bit, and I'm also sure I'm a bit more distant during and immediately after my meditation while I recenter in the real world, but my overall stress diminishes greatly. So, short term, yes, I'm almost certain my productivity is down. But long term, I'm a more resilient, calm, and focused worker, which means more to me than a smile on my face.

  • Facebook gave just as much air to both campaigns, indeed, ALL the campaigns, but in the end, Donald Trump's supporters (I among them) pushed arelentless drive of both support for Mr Trump and counter support for Hillary Clinton. Her support base was demoralized in her character, won over by bargaining

    Facebook gave just as much air to both campaigns, indeed, ALL the campaigns, but in the end, Donald Trump's supporters (I among them) pushed arelentless drive of both support for Mr Trump and counter support for Hillary Clinton. Her support base was demoralized in her character, won over by bargaining strength, and in general, silenced by th volume of pro-Trump enthusiasm. A true court of public opinion.

  • Donald Trump's looked like he was about to conduct a serious job interview haha, and Un just looked ecstatic to actually be at the table. Neither appears to be overly combative or duplicitous in their body language, and both seem to have a view of the seriousness of the moment. it should boil down to a good round of talks.

  • why aren't we offering trade alliances and civil infrastructure help like we did with Japan? these people have all that ore and nowhere to sell it. their fiscal and general survival should be enough of a bargaining point.

  • It's not economical to have children anymore. The state has intercededi to the family so much that even if you can financially support a child (unlikely), you're still almost forbidden from passing down your own values and family traditions like out great grandparents did. the eight hours a day they

    It's not economical to have children anymore. The state has intercededi to the family so much that even if you can financially support a child (unlikely), you're still almost forbidden from passing down your own values and family traditions like out great grandparents did. the eight hours a day they spend in school (plus homework) alienates them from family time and values and you're left wondering why you parented a child that inth end, belonged to the state anyways.

    once more people stop relying on the school system and the state to dictate their family values, things like hard work, responsibility, manners and social skills, and the all around innocent joy or childhood can return to the child's "curriculum" and more people will see a family as a source of happiness and a work worth taking up than just another ball and chain in today's mindless society.

    kids were happier (and less likely to eat Tide pods) when they had chores before school, less homework, and more time building family and personal social bonds. today's children are more likely to have panic attack than anything at the thought of self reliance and discipline, and that in itself, and the situation and circumstances that cause it, are more the reason than anything (from what I can see) that fewer americans are starting families.

  • Can you even consider yourself American if your article argues against what we consider fourth amendment rights (security in one's possession and whatnot)? I see Americans these days watching the slow creep of big brother and applauding more than I care to think about. This is a long sought-after victory

    Can you even consider yourself American if your article argues against what we consider fourth amendment rights (security in one's possession and whatnot)? I see Americans these days watching the slow creep of big brother and applauding more than I care to think about. This is a long sought-after victory, when groups like Facebook can't just sell your personal information to the highest bidder, even if it is the police. Good job EU, sticking up for sovereign right.

  • it is the duty of any nation to honor their military dead. it's not a political grandstand or an authoritarian monument of mind slavery. since there has been man, there has been war, and it is almost unilaterally recognized that it is the sacred duty of the living to properly memorialize those who sacrificed

    it is the duty of any nation to honor their military dead. it's not a political grandstand or an authoritarian monument of mind slavery. since there has been man, there has been war, and it is almost unilaterally recognized that it is the sacred duty of the living to properly memorialize those who sacrificed all.

    I'm sure that the burials will be become more of exclusive to combat wounded and medal recipients only while more land is procured for the continuance of our military tradition, but it wouldn't be the first time that traditions had been changed permanently, if exclusivity becomes and remains the bottom line.

  • I once listened to a speech by a retired military officer at a parade. He speculated that the third world war would be fought over water.

    People do desperate things when they are in need, and a resource like water becoming a shortage is sure to cause a bit of chaos.

    This is definitely a situation

    I once listened to a speech by a retired military officer at a parade. He speculated that the third world war would be fought over water.

    People do desperate things when they are in need, and a resource like water becoming a shortage is sure to cause a bit of chaos.

    This is definitely a situation to keep an eye on, but I don't see any way of doing anything about it this late in the game, except to begin to make our changes and deal with what may be the catastrophic consequences of late action.

  • I stand behind raising the limit to 21 for semiautomatics, and I absolutely understand the stance of the NRA in this case. Hunting rifles are an integral part of many communities, where deer, moose, bear, and other large game species abound. Raising the age requirement to buy any rifle is going to cut

    I stand behind raising the limit to 21 for semiautomatics, and I absolutely understand the stance of the NRA in this case. Hunting rifles are an integral part of many communities, where deer, moose, bear, and other large game species abound. Raising the age requirement to buy any rifle is going to cut deep at the cultural heart of America. I sincerely hope the president changes his stance.